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THURSDAY - MAY 28,  2015

INVESTIGATION INTO FIRE DEATH IN CROOKSTON CONTINUES

The investigation continues into the death of Balvir Kaur, 60 of Crookston. Kaur passed away on May 22 at a burn unit in the Twin Cities as a result of her injuries suffered from burns in a fire on May 21 at her home. Crookston Police Chief Paul Biermaier told KROX that the State Fire Marshall and the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is still investigating the incident which they believe in an isolated incident and the public has no reason to be concerned.

 

 

REPRESENTATIVE DEB KIEL TALKS ABOUT THE SESSION AND UPCOMING SPECIAL SESSION

Representative Deb Kiel, of Crookston, has returned home after the legislature adjourned and it now waiting for the special session . Representative Kiel talked said she was disappointed they couldn’t come together on the education bill. “I am disappointed we could not come to an agreement, the Governor said he would sign everything, but the education bill,” said Kiel. “He vetoed three bills so we are headed back to discuss them and I believe we can get it done in a day and move on. I think there are some good reforms and more money for all schools and not just specific programs.”
Transportation should get some action at the special session. “Transportation was passed with a minor improvement, small communities under 5,000 will see some dollars to help maintain their streets,” said Kiel. “Hopefully with the billion dollars or more we will do major reform for our roads and bridges in the next session.”
The bonding bill could come up again and include the request for money for the renovations at the county incinerator in Fosston. “The bonding bill passed the senate, but not the house. but it could come up at the special session,” said Kiel. “I think the Legacy will come up at the session which will help the soil and water conservation service with the buffer strips.”

 

 

CROOKSTON HOSTS HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DIALOGUE GATHERING WITH STATE HOUSING COMMISSIONER IN ATTENDENCE

Crookston hosted an area housing and community dialogue on Wednesday at the Crookston Inn with housing specialists from Northwestern Minnesota and the State of Minnesota housing office. Housing Commissioner Mary Tingerthal was in attendance to listen and learn and was pleased with the attendance. “I very struck by the large crowd from the different communities and showed people are concerned about housing in their communities for all income levels,” said Tingerthal. “There are very few projects that we finance without partners so we bring resources like getting a lender to have the first mortgage on the property so we have conversations with developers and lenders to make it work. You have a high percentage of homeowners in the area and we get financial support from the Greater Minnesota Housing Fund and USDA.”

The seniors have a challenge with their limited income. “They may be living in a house where the mortgage is paid off and sometimes they have to spend down their assets, but sometimes making the trade off is best for everyone,” said Tingerthal. “We heard a lot of concerns about rules and regulations so we will work on specific ideas and make changes in St. Paul.”

Warren Hanson, representing the Greater Minnesota Housing Fund, said Crookston and other cities in the area are doing a lot of planning, “That lays the ground work for the resources, the key thing is to form a public and private partnership with the housing authority, developers, lenders, builders and others to build affordable housing.” USDA fits into the partnership. “They have tens of thousands of housing projects throughout the state which were built in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s and now that is tired and old and needs to be rehabilitated and preserved,” said Hanson. “USDA figures into working with older and low income persons and it needs to be preserved or we will lose the stock so today we cooperate with USDA and try to identify the projects at risk and that can be saved.”

 

 

POLK COUNTY TO GET OVER $80,000 FOR AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES PREVENTION

Polk County has a grant of $80,337.00 to be used for Aquatic Invasive Species prevention with the newly organized task force. “The state legislature has appropriated funding the last few years to fight the spread of the aquatic invasive species like zebra mussels and other species which are transported on watercraft so we are using the funds to work on prevention,” said Josh Holte, Polk County Planning and Zoning Administrator. The county could receive another $55,405.00 from the legislature this year.

The County commissioners approved three conditional use permit requests at their meeting on Tuesday. Lawrence Olderbak, Kurt Larson and Pat Gerzewski made the requests. Olderbak wants to replace three accessory structures on his land in Sullivan Township on five acres, Kurt Larson wants to build a 195 by 60 foot storage building that would contain 26 self storage units on 12.76 acres in Grove Park Township. A neighbor Linda Hanson opposes the permit as she considers the traffic a safety hazard and her privacy will be hindered by the project. Pat Gerzewski will construct and operate a 38 unit campground on 11.6 acres along the shore land district by Lake Sarah and Union Lake in Section 30 of Knute Township. The property is the former St. Michaels Campground which he recently purchased.

 

 

CROOKSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY KICKS OFF SUMMER READING PROGRAM

Crookston Library Kicks Off Summer Reading Program Next week, the Crookston Public Library will kick off its music-themed Summer Reading Program, called “Read to the Rhythm.” Area youth are invited to the library for the program’s first event, which is the beginning of a summer filled with fun events at the library! If you go… What: Summer Reading Program Kick-Off Event. Youth are invited to decorate their own reading bag, check out books and begin filling their reading logs. Reusable bags and art supplies will be provided. This event is made possible by the Crookston Friends of the Library. When: Wednesday, June 3 at 2 p.m. Where: Crookston Public Library, 110 N. Ash St. Crookston Public Library is a branch of Lake Agassiz Regional Library, which is a consolidated public library system comprised of 13 branch libraries and nine LINK sites serving the residents of seven counties in northwest Minnesota. More information is available at www.larl.org.



 

UMC PLANTS OVER 8,300 FLOWERS ON THE GROUNDS, PUBLIC WELCOME TO VISIT CAMPUS

The wellness center isn't the only thing coming up at the University of Minnesota Crookston this spring. Crews have been planting flowers and the gardens are once again colorful and ready for start of summer. Thus far, some 8300 flowers have been planted and the entire campus community is grateful to the hardworking staff who make it all happen! 


B
ack row: Greg Benoit, Nell DeBoer, Larry Anderson and Jerry Rude
Front row: Delaney McIntyre, Rebecca Sanders, Neal Vraa and James Warmack.

 

 

ANDY OMAN DONATES TO THE RIVERVIEW FOUNDATION

Crookston’s Andy Oman tries to live his life every day by a quote from Nelson Mandela: “What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.’’ Therefore, it seems fitting that Oman is being recognized for his generosity and the difference he is making in the lives of babies born at RiverView Health.
Through the RiverView Foundation, Oman is responsible for fulfilling the need for a second infant warmer in RiverView’s OB Department. While the machine is referred to as a “warmer’’ it does so much more; it combines in one device functions such as breathing support, suction, and heat regulation, which are important for the initial care of a newborn.
RiverView Inpatient Director Annie Waldal foresees the warmer getting a lot of use as deliveries increase at RiverView after the recent implementation of epidural anesthesia. A warmer will now be housed in the Emergency Department for easier access should a critical situation arise where an infant’s safety and well-being is in jeopardy.
Oman is the owner of Oman State Farm Insurance in Crookston with the company’s well known slogan: “Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.’’ Like a good neighbor, Oman not only donates to the hospital but he also gives of his time as a member of the RiverView Board of Directors.
“Riverview Health is an exceptional healthcare organization in which I’m excited to give,’’ he stated. “And, what better way than bringing warmth to newborn babies in our community! Thanks to Kent Bruun for connecting me to this opportunity.”
Kent Bruun is the director of the RiverView Foundation and is proud to connect Oman with something that “fits and totally honors Andy’s wishes to support projects that benefit families that RiverView serves and that he protects through his business.”
For more information on any of the projects through the RiverView Foundation, contact Bruun at 218-281-9249 or email kbruun@riverviewhealth.org.


Director of RiverView’s Inpatient Unit Annie Waldal, Foundation Director Kent Bruun, Andy Oman, and nurses Linda Bahls and Nichole Johnson.

 

 

WEDNESDAY - MAY 27,  2015

CROOKSTON CITY COUNCIL TAKES ONE STEP CLOSER TO GETTING A 30 UNIT HOUSING COMPLEX

The Crookston City Council passed a resolution in support of the 30 unit multi-family housing development for the city and transferred funds to the Crookston Housing and Economic Development Authority (CHEDA) for the project at their meeting on Tuesday. “This is big for Crookston as we go through the application process and get the tax credits, but this is another step and appreciate the councils support and Tri-Valley appreciates the support also,” said Crookston City Administrator Shannon Stassen. “For CHEDA to be a partner we are transferring $200,000 for the purchase of the property for the housing project and makes them a partner and strengthens the grant application.”
Jason Carlson, Executive Director at Tri Valley Opportunity Council thanked the city council for their support of the 30 unit housing project and encouraged them to attend the housing meeting today.

The council had the second reading and final passage of the amended ordinance dealing with health and safety nuisance which modifies enforcement and abatement procedures and adds an administrative fine. The change will help the fire department control junk problems in residential areas.

Jerry Amiot, President of the Polk County Historical Society asked for support in raising funds for the Polk County Museum and explained all the programs sponsored by the society.

The council approved variances for the Clements Addition and Sampson’s Woodland Addition.

Interviews are being done for the accountant position at city hall.

 

 

CROOKSTON WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE TABLES ARENA LEASE AGREEMENT FOR NOW

The Crookston Ways and Means Committee met after the city council meeting and discussed negotiations with the Crookston School District on their agreement for use of the Crookston Sports Center. It was recommended to have a five year contract with a starting interest rate of 1.3 percent up to 1.8 percent over the three years. The school district started out paying $100,000 and now pays $106,000 and would go to $111,000. The committee tabled the ideas as they want more financial figures. “We are going to continue the costs of the Sports Center and postponed the decision on the lease with the school district after we look at utility costs for the years ahead,” said Stassen.

The committee rejected a request from Bradley Rupard for assistance with a sewer problem at his resident. The city insurance company said the city was not negligent and was not required to pay for the damages.



 

CITY OF CROOKSTON ADDS TWO FULL TIME OFFICERS AND A PARKING ENFORCEMENT OFFICER

The City of Crookston has two new policemen on staff. “We had final offers to two recruits, one to Andrew Goodman who lives in Crookston and has started his training which takes a few weeks and then field training for three months. We hired Kyle Harding who will start in late June and we are excited to be at full staff,” said Crookston Police Chief Paul Biermaier. “We have a police reserve officer who is a UMC student, Tyler Corrier, will be enforcing parking regulations mainly on the Main, Broadway and the side streets in between in downtown. We look forward to him being out their and enforcing the laws of parking.” Corrier will start his duties on June 1.

 

 

CROOKSTON SCHOOL BOARD OKAYS SUMMER PROGRAMS, WAITING FOR AN OKAY FROM THE STATE TO REPAIR THE PARKING LOTS

The Crookston School board approved the bid for the parking lot renovations at the Crookston High School at their meeting on Tuesday. Facilities supervisor Rick Niemela explained how the process is on hold. “We put out the specs for the project and got one bid from Davidson Construction of Newfolden for $1.2 million for the two parking lots,” said Niemela. “After we opened the bid and give the award we have to go through the review and comment on the blueprints on the project, so we are waiting on the state as to when we can get started.”

The school board approved summer employment agreements with Chris Gough for summer band instruction, Spencer Frie for summer orchestra instruction and Karen Danielson as a summer food service helper at Washington School.

The resignation from Beth Carlson as one act play director was accepted. Summer programs for the area learning center, Northern Lights Academy, band, orchestra, and Community and Special Education were approved.

 

 

HEAD ON CRASH NEAR GOODRIDGE CLAIMS LIFE OF 29 YEAR OLD WARREN MAN

A head-on crash in Pennington County on Tuesday afternoon killed one man and left another in serious condition after both vehicles erupted in flames, according the Pennington County Sheriff’s Office.
The Pennington County Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene in Goodridge, around 2:30 p.m.  Jacob J. Kasprowicz, 29, of Warren was driving east on 190th St. NE. in a Pontiac Grand Am when a Chevy Silverado pickup truck heading the other way crossed the centerline, according to Minnesota State Patrol. The truck collided with his Grand Am, setting both vehicles on fire.  Kasprowicz died at the scene, police said. The 41-year-old pickup driver, Scott W. Srnsky, of Thief River Falls, was transported to Sanford Health in Fargo, N.D., with serious injuries.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON WOMAN THAT DIED FROM BURN INJURIES IS IDENTIFIED

On Thursday, May 21 at 1:57 p.m. the Crookston Police Department, Crookston Fire Department and Crookston Area Ambulance responded to a report of a person on fire at 308 South Nelson Street in Crookston. Upon arrival emergency responders found a 60 year old female outside the home severely burned. She was immediately transported by Crookston Area Ambulance to RiverView Health and later airlifted to a burn unit in the Twin Cities metro area. There was very little damage to the home; no other details are being released at this time as this is an open and ongoing investigation.

UPDATE: MAY 26
The identity of the victim severely burned on May 21 has been released; Balvir Kaur, 60, of 308 South Nelson Street, #2, in Crookston.  Kaur passed away on May 22 at a burn unit in the Twin Cities as a result of her injuries.  The incident is still under investigation with the assistance of the State Fire Marshal and the MN Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.  This is an isolated incident, no other persons are believed to be involved and there are no public safety concerns related to this incident.

 

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH TO HOLD A NOON LUNCHEON ON THURSDAY, MAY 28

May is Stroke Awareness Month. According to the American Stroke Association, someone has a stroke every 40 seconds in the United States making stroke the leading cause of disability and the number five cause of death.
A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, occurs when a blockage stops the flow of blood to the brain or when a blood vessel in or around the brain bursts. Although many people think of stroke as a condition that affects only older adults, a stroke can and does occur in people of all ages. In fact, nearly a quarter of all strokes occur in people younger than age 65.
Speech and language pathologists at RiverView Health work closely with stroke patients every day. Marie Johnstad, coordinator of the Speech Department, hosts a 3 PM Stroke Support Group the second Wednesday of each month in Meeting Room 2 at RiverView. The group meets April through October and is free. For more information on the support group, contact Johnstad at 218-281-9438.
Johnstad will present a stroke-related Health Luncheon Thursday, May 28 for anyone interested in learning the signs of stroke and what can be done after a stroke has occurred. The presentation is titled “Stroke – What a Survivor Would Tell You’’ and several stroke survivors from RiverView’s Stroke Support Group will attend the meeting to answer questions.
The luncheon will be held in Meeting Room #1 beginning at noon. Meeting Room #1 is located near the RiverView Clinic entrance on the north side of the hospital and across from the elevators on first floor.
The luncheon series is in its 17th year of sponsorship by RiverView Health. All men and women interested in improving their health are invited to attend. Each luncheon starts a few minutes past noon and luncheons are kept under one hour so those needing to return to work can attend. The presentations are free and attendees can bring their own lunches or purchase a healthy, boxed lunch for $3.00. Pre-registration is required and boxed lunch orders must be placed at the time of pre-registration. Call Holly Anderson at 281-9745 or toll free 1-800-743-6551, extension 9745, for additional information and to pre-register.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON PIRATE FINE ART BOOSTERS HAND OUT MONETARY GIFTS TO CHS STUDENTS ATTENDING CAMPS


Crookston High Schools students (left to right) Macy Larson, Courtney Dalrymple, Charles Brantner, Megan Frisk, Zach Sanders and Marie Sandman were presented financial awards to attend summer arts camps by Jim Kent president of the Pirate Fine Arts Boosters.  $1200 was given to students to attend the International Music camp in sculpture, band, dance and musical theater.   Other camps attending will be the All State Band camp and various dance camps.   

 

 

MRS. GREER'S SECOND GRADE CLASS HOSTS A WAX MUSEUM

Mrs. Greer’s second grade class hosted a wax museum on Thursday, May 21, at Highland Elementary School. Her students began the project by learning about and choosing a famous American to research. The students then answered questions about their American by writing a paragraph explaining who they were, where they were from and what their major accomplishments were. In addition to memorizing their paragraph, students and their families came up with a simple costume to fully adorn the personality and look of their famous American. Famous Americans ranged anywhere from President John Adams to rapper Eminem. Parents were then invited to view the grand opening of the wax museum in which students acted like wax figures until a viewer stepped on their button, where they would “come to life” and act out their speech. It was truly a learning experience for all.


                            Some of the students during the wax museum last week

 

 

 

TUESDAY - MAY 26,  2015

CROOKSTON CITY COUNCIL MEETS TONIGHT

The Crookston City Council meets 7:00 tonight (Tuesday) in the Crookston City Council Chambers at City Hall.
The consent agenda includes a resolution of support for a 30 unit multi family housing development in the city and a resolution to increase the 2015 council general fund budget by $400,000 and expending $200,000 by transferring that amount to CHEDA to complete the purchase of land for the new workforce housing development. A resolution to accept a grant from the Northwest Minnesota Foundation for the comprehensive plan expense. Two variance requests are on the agenda in Clements Addition and Sampson’s Woodland Addition.
The regular agenda has the second reading and final passage of an ordinance entitled health and safety nuisance (for junk yards) by modifying the enforcement and abatement procedures and adding an administrative fine provision. An ordinance will be introduced amending the Building Code by perpetually adopting the current edition of the Minnesota State Building Code.
The meeting is open to the public.

The Crookston Ways and Means Committee will meet following the council meeting.

 

 

 

GRAND OPENING HELD FOR THE RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY GARDEN IN CROOKSTON

The Riverside Community Garden in Crookston is being planted with vegetables and flowers after a grand opening celebration on Friday. DeAndra O’Connell is coordinating the project in partnership with the City of Crookston and the Center for Sustainability at the University of Minnesota Crookston, which is part of making the city a Green Step City. “One of the requirements for the GreenStep City is to have an area for people to grown their own food so we have eight boxes for people to plant and one handicapped box,” said O’Connell. “We will also have a berry garden, pumpkin and corn patches so there will be things for everyone to look at as well as participate, all the boxes have been spoken for already.”
Kirsten Fagerlund, representing the Polk County Wellness Coalition and the State Health Improvement Program, said community gardens give residents a chance to grow their own food. “We are all working to help people make better healthier choices by creating an environment through a community garden and this makes food more accessible to people,” said Fagerlund. “And the wellness coalition is happy to participate and we have some funding so we put in $2,000 from the Department of Health, which helps put in structures for community gardens.”
The group also celebrated the 99th birthday of Allen Pedersen, a gardening expert who has grown vegetables for years and shared them with the community.

 

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH FOUNDATION GOLF CLASSIC TO BE HELD JUNE 8

It’s almost time to tee-it-up for the annual RiverView Health Foundation Golf Classic! This year marks the eleventh year of the popular event that has financially made so many projects reality at RiverView Health over the years.
The Golf Classic will be held Monday, June 8 at Minakwa Golf Club, Crookston. To register, go to www.riverviewhealth.org and find the registration form on the events page or call Foundation Director Kent Bruun at 218-281-9249.
“RiverView Foundation counts on our friends and business partners to help insure that we can continue to provide necessary access to quality health care services in our community and region,’’ said Bruun. “With past stakeholder support, the Foundation has raised over $228,500 in the short ten-year history of this event which has effectively supported priority initiatives focused on providing exceptional patient care, always.’’

Infusion/PCA Pumps, Lab Analyzer

According to Bruun, funds raised through the 11th Annual Golf Classic will be designated to the purchase of Infusion/PCA pumps and a lab analyzer. The new pumps will replace existing pumps that have exceeded their expected useful lives with a standardized platform and smart pump technology.  This will enable RiverView to most effectively and efficiently meet the needs of its patients to improve care.  The lab analyzer is used every day of the week.  The analyzer helps increase efficiency and turnaround time because it reduces the number of manual slide reviews performed by the lab technician. "The new hematology analyzer is responsible for running one of the most common blood tests – a complete blood count or CBC,'' explained Emily Nelson, director of RiverView's Laboratory. "This basic test aids in determining your general health status and is used to screen for, diagnose, or monitor any one of a variety of diseases and conditions that affect blood cells, such as anemia, infection, inflammation, bleeding disorder or cancer.''
Nelson goes on to state that this highly administered, very quick and simple test produces valuable information with which providers can work to determine the best route of care.

Projects funded through the Years

The following is a summary of projects accomplished through the Golf Classic profits over the past ten years:
2014: $28,500; Vital Monitoring System
2013: $27,000; work simulator project
2012: $27,000; three anesthesia machines
2011: $25,500; central cardiac monitoring system for the ER
2010: $22,600; CT/MRI radiology project
2009: $23,000; inpatient beds
2008: $22,000; hospital inpatient renovation project
2007: $20,000; digital heart monitoring/event recording for RiverView’s primary care clinics
2006: $16,700; stereotactic 3-dimensional breast biopsy services to the Community
2005: $16,200; telemetry heart monitoring system for the Intensive Care Unit at RiverView Hospital 

RiverView Foundation’s mission is to assure continued excellence in healthcare.  For more information on any of the Foundation’s programs, contact Bruun at 218-281-9249 or kbruun@riverviewhealth.org.

 

 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Thank you Polk County Community Fund for keeping your donations LOCAL-  from Lori Wagner the Villa St. Vincent/the SUMMIT Foundation Director

In 2014 the Board of the Polk County Community fund decided to keep monies local.  Bless their hearts. We did receive a gift from this fund to further our services to individuals with Alzheimer’s and related dementias in our Memory Care Unit-Thank you!
Being a former United Way Director, and now the Foundation Director at Villa St. Vincent Short Term Care and Rehabilitation Unit and Long Term Care Facility and The SUMMIT Assisted Living, I have seen the need for money to stay local.  I wish to pose one question- Do you know how much of every dollar you give goes to the cause?  You may be shocked as I share my experience.
A recent cold Saturday afternoon the phone rang with a pleasant sounding gal soliciting for a cancer fund.  She called me an “angel from heaven”, and being unaware of the specific company I gave her a few minutes to explain their mission.   She flattered me more and I listened, we agreed upon a $40.00 donation.  But I told her before I write my check, I wanted to know how much would go to the patients and how much went to administration?  She paused and called her supervisor.  I posed the same question to her supervisor who then forwarded me to a manager who finally was able to tell me that 85% of my donation or $34 dollars goes to administration and 15% and the remaining $6 dollars goes to the patient.  I declined their pitch.
So I urge YOU all to ask every time, that you give out your precious money to ask the same question.  I feel that locally our community is very conservative on administrative costs as a whole-Crookston is such a great place to call home.    I am very proud to say that for every dollar you give the Villa St. Vincent/The SUMMIT Foundation 100% of your dollar goes to the program or project of your choice.  
So please, ask questions and be a savvy donor-seek non-profits who are transparent and deserve your trust. 
Feel free to email me at Lori.wagner@bhshealth.org  or call at 218-281-0762 with any feedback.  Thanks to you all for your ongoing support of our mission as we provide, “Care and Services with Dignity and Grace”. 

 

 

MONDAY - MAY 25,  2015

CROOKSTON VETERANS COUNCIL HOLDS MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONIES IN CROOKSTON AND THE AREA

 
Denice Milton spoke at this years Memorial Day Ceremony at Oakdale Cemetery in Crookston  Corky Reynolds with the response to Flanders Fields.
 

The Crookston Veterans Council held their annual Memorial Day Service at Oakdale Cemetery on Monday morning in front of a large crowd.  The Crookston Band Ensemble with Chris Gough directing played music, Msgr. Roger Grundhaus will gave the invocation and benediction. Miss Crookston Madison Crane performed In Flanders Field and Charles Reynolds had the reply to Flanders Fields. Denice Milton of the 9th district American Legion gave the address.
The Veteran’s Council and Auxiliary decorated the graves and Bill Cassavant will serve as chaplain. The Firing Squad was in attendance and taps was played by Christian Halos with Brian Halos as the drummer. The service concluded with the Star Spangled Banner by the Band Ensemble.


    All the veterans in attendance of the 2015 Memorial Day Ceremony at Oakdale Cemetery in Crookston                           The colors were presented at the ceremony


                  The Crookston Community band playing, led by instructor Chris Gough, plays during the ceremony


 

CROOKSTON SCHOOL BOARD WILL MEET TUESDAY, MAY 26

The Crookston School District School Board will meet on Tuesday, May 26 at 5:00 p.m. in the Crookston High School Choir/Orchestra room.  Meetings are normally held on Monday’s, but the meeting was moved to Tuesday because Monday was Memorial Day. 
Personnel items on the agenda include an employment agreement with Chris Gough for summer band instructor and Spence Frie for summer orchestra instructor.  They will be asked to approve employment with Karen Danielson for Summer Food Service Helper at Washington School.  The board will also be asked to accept a resignation letter from Beth Carlson as one-act play director.
Items on the main agenda are approval of the revision of the summer school board meeting dates on June 29, July 13, August 10 and 24.  Approve renewal of the Minnesota State High School League Membership.  They will also approve summer programs for the Area Learning Center, Northern Lights Academy, Band, Orchestra, and Community Education. 
The board will hear reports from the principals (Eric Bubna, Chris Trostad, and Denice Oliver) and the superintendent. 
Visitors may share comments and/or concerns with the school board before or at the end of the meeting.

 

 

SATURDAY - MAY 23,  2015

REVEREND JOSEPH PALANIVEL JEYAPAUL PLEADS GUILTY TO SEXUALLY ASSAULTING A 16 YEAR OLD

Reverend Joseph Palanivel Jeyapaul, 60, a catholic priest pleaded guilty Friday to sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl while serving in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Crookston. The guilty plea comes nearly 10 years after he assaulted the girl at his home in Greenbush.  Jeyapaul pleaded guilty to fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct, a felony, in one of the two cases. The other case, in which he is charged with two counts of first degree criminal sexual conduct, is still pending.
The maximum penalty for fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct is 10 years imprisonment.
In the other case, Jeyapaul faces more serious charges, punishable by up to 30 years imprisonment per charge.  The victim told police Jeyapaul had violently forced her to give him oral sex and fondled her in the rectory of Blessed Sacrament Church in Greenbush when she was 14, according to court documents.
Jeyapaul was an administrator of Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Greenbush, as well as St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Middle River, and St. Edward's Catholic Church in Karlstad, from the fall 2004 to the fall 2005.
Jeyapaul will be sentenced in the first case on June 15.

 

 

LAST WEEK'S FROST CREATES FROST CONCERN FOR SOYBEAN GROWERS

Last week’s frost created concern for soybean producers, especially those with emerged beans. Although most area soybeans were still protected below ground, or still in the bag, some beans had emerged. Following is recent information from Bruce Potter, UM IPM Specialist.
Spring frost damage to soybean is relatively rare in Minnesota, as the last average frost dates usually occur before soybeans are normally planted. However, soybean planting and emergence is well ahead of the 5-year average, leaving the crop more vulnerable to early season frost events. Temperatures dropped into the upper 20s (F) in the west-central and northwestern parts of the state, likely resulting in some degree of frost injury to emerged soybeans in select areas.
Temperatures at or below 28-30° F for several hours are usually needed to kill soybean tissue. However, an air temperature of 28° F does not guarantee that a soybean crop will freeze.
Although emerged corn was likely frost-damaged, corn seedlings are at a lower risk of death from freezing temperatures than are soybeans, because the growing point of corn remains below ground until the fifth leaf stage. Frost damaged corn will likely recover and should begin to regrow within a few days. In soybean however, the growing points are above ground and are exposed after the cotyledons open. Freezing of all growing points is fatal. However, soybean is better able to compensate for partial stand losses than is corn.
Newly emerged soybeans are protected by the nearby warm soil, and small, emerging and cotyledon stage soybeans can be a bit more tolerant to freezing temperatures than older soybean or corn leaves. For example, in a 2001 study at NDSU, the temperature required to kill 1/2 of the seedlings was as low as 24°F. Older soybeans are less freeze tolerant.
Crook stage soybeans will be killed if the crook tissue below the cotyledons is killed. Likewise, frozen tissue below the cotyledons of any older soybean will result in death. However, if the frost only affects the tops of the young soybean, those with one or more intact cotyledons might recover from surviving axillary buds. In more advanced early season soybeans, regrowth may occur from one of the vegetative buds in the leaf axils. If leaf axils haven't been frozen, the frosted soybean should regrow from one of these growing points.
What are the risk factors? Cold air settles into low-lying areas, heavy residue tends to keep rising soil heat at or below the soil surface, and dry soils tend to lose heat more quickly than moist soils; these environments are more likely to produce freeze injured soybeans. Many other factors like cloud cover, wind, soil temperature, soybean stage, previous weather and genetics influence injury from frost. This often leads to very spotty injury across the landscape.
Soybean frost injury appears as water-soaked lesions on the cotyledons, leaves, or hypocotyl that dry and turn brown after several days. Assessing frost damage should be delayed 3 to 5 days after the event to allow the soybean plants to show signs of new growth. Check for firm, healthy stems, cotyledons and growing points. By this time, it should be evident whether the soybeans are recovering or are dead. If a significant proportion of the population is dead, replanting may be justified. For more information on replanting decisions, see: The soybean grower's guide for evaluating crop damage and replant decisions.
Freeze injury is a traumatic physiological event for the plant and can slow development of soybeans for several days. Affected areas of the field with significant stem and cotyledon damage should be replanted if recovery remains slow. Areas with greatly reduced stands can be replanted by spiking in a full seeding rate alongside the old rows, when replanting can be accomplished by late May.
For more information, contact me at 800-450-2465 or stordahl@umn.edu.   Source: Bruce Potter, UM IPM Specialist.

 

 

FRIDAY - MAY 22,  2015

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL SAYS HELLO TO THEIR NEWEST ALUMNI FRIDAY NIGHT WITH GRADUATION CEREMONY

The Class of 2015 has officially graduated from Crookston High School after the graduation ceremony on Friday night at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus.  The student speakers were Danny Davidson and Sydney Boike.  The foreign exchange student, Maria Camila Cortes Bravo also spoke during the ceremony.  The teacher selected to speak was Shelly Thomforde and proud parents and school board members Dave Davidson and Kari Miller handed out diplomas.


  Click above to see the end of the Crookston High School Graduation ceremony


              Jamee Lynn Rasmussen receives her diploma                           Emmanuel Mello receives his diploma                                      Hayley Viken receives her diploma

FOR PICTURES OF ALL THE GRADUATES CLICK HERE

 

 

 

CROOKSTON WOMAN THAT DIED FROM BURN INJURIES IS IDENTIFIED

On Thursday, May 21 at 1:57 p.m. the Crookston Police Department, Crookston Fire Department and Crookston Area Ambulance responded to a report of a person on fire at 308 South Nelson Street in Crookston. Upon arrival emergency responders found a 60 year old female outside the home severely burned. She was immediately transported by Crookston Area Ambulance to RiverView Health and later airlifted to a burn unit in the Twin Cities metro area. There was very little damage to the home; no other details are being released at this time as this is an open and ongoing investigation.

UPDATE: MAY 26

The identity of the victim severely burned on May 21st has been released; Balvir Kaur, 60, of 308 South Nelson Street, #2, in Crookston.  Kaur passed away on May 22nd at a burn unit in the Twin Cities as a result of her injuries.  The incident is still under investigation with the assistance of the State Fire Marshal and the MN Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.  This is an isolated incident, no other persons are believed to be involved and there are no public safety concerns related to this incident.

 

 

MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE ACTIVITIES SCHEDULE IN THE CROOKSTON AREA ON MONDAY

The Crookston Veteran’s Council will have Memorial Day Services starting at 7:30 a.m. on Monday at the American Legion and leaving for Hafslo Church at 8:00 for the service at 8:20. They will move to St. Peter’s Catholic Church Cemetery in Gentilly for the service at 9:00.
A coffee break will be at 9:30 at RBJ’s with the service at Oakdale Cemetery in Crookston at 10:00 with the flag raising at the entrance. Naval Services will be at 11 at the Sampson’s Addition Bridge. At noon the veterans will be at the Sand Hill Lutheran Church in Climax and then return to the Crookston Memorial Walkway at 12:45 followed by a dinner at the Crookston American Legion for the participants.
The Memorial Day Service at Oakdale Cemetery will have music with the Crookston Band Ensemble with Chris Gough directing. Msgr. Roger Grundhaus will give the invocation and benediction. Miss Crookston Madison Crane will perform In Flanders Field and Charles Reynolds will reply to Flanders Fields. Denice Milton of the 9th district American Legion will give the address.
The Veteran’s Council and Auxiliary will decorate the graves. Bill Cassavant will serve as chaplain. The Firing Squad will perform and taps will be played by Christian Halos with Brian Halos as the drummer. The service will conclude with the Star Spangled Banner by the Band Ensemble.

 

 

 CROOKSTON PIRATE MARCHING BAND LOOKING TO GET NEW UNIFORMS IN SCHOOL COLORS!!!

The Crookston High School Marching Band Instructor Chris Gough is looking to change their look with new uniforms, which were unveiled at the Crookston High School Band Concert last week.  Crookston currently has red, black, and white uniforms and they are several decades old and are getting tough to keep up and it is time to update the uniforms, most importantly, in school colors.  “First of all the new uniforms are in school colors, so I really like that.  It would include new uniforms, new hats, new shoes, and we are also looking at doing some new uniforms for the Treasurettes as well,” said Gough. “The reason why we are trying to do new uniforms now is because the old uniforms are deteriorating and are becoming harder to maintain and there are a lot of individual parts that get lost throughout the course of the year and they are also red, white and black.”  The new uniforms should be easy to maintain and care for. “The new uniforms would have two parts and one size fits all.  They would have snap hems that would allow for length, so a student could get a uniform in ninth grade and keep the uniform until they graduate,” said Gough. “Right now we take back the uniform and try to do resizing work over the summer and that will ease that a little bit.”
The cost of a new uniform will be around $350 each.  “We are looking to do some fundraising things with one event planned for marching band camp this summer at the end of July.  We are also looking for donations, any little bit would help,” said Gough. “We are hopefully going to be selling the old uniforms for the cost of a new uniform to give the community members or even Pirate marching band alumni a chance to buy their old uniform and keep it forever.”
For inquiries about how to donate, contact Chris Gough at chrisgough@isd593.org

 
Zach Lutz models the proposed new uniforms for the Pirate Marching Band


 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE CONDUCTING AWARDS PROGRAM AGAIN THIS YEAR

The Chamber of Commerce Beautification Committee will again be conducting the beautification awards program.  The committee will be doing three rounds of judging throughout the summer in four different categories:
-Presentation of a Landscaped Business
-Presentation of a Storefront Business
-Presentation of a Public Institution or Church 
-Special Achievement (recognition of ongoing achievement)

The committee will be out judging in the next few weeks with the first round qualifiers announced the second week of June. Some of the other projects the committee is working on include maintaining the Main Street Courtyard, the spot on the corner of LeBlanc Realty, maintenance of the entrance signs and painting the adopted downtown corner planters.  There are still two planters available for individuals, clubs or businesses to adopt.
The committee is asking for the community's help in the "Adopt a Basket" program, you will see the hanging baskets lining the streets of the city as well as the addition of four more large pots that will be out on the medians.  You are encouraged to please call Sandy or Rose at the Chamber office 281-4320 to help keep this program alive.  Special thanks to the City of Crookston crew for the daily watering of these and to D&D Thomforde's for the planting and supervision of the flowers. 

 

 FOR THE OBITUARY PAGE  CLICK HERE

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