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TUESDAY - FEBRUARY 9,  2016

CROOKSTON CITY COUNCIL FIELDS QUESTIONS ON STREET IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS

The Crookston City Council met on Monday evening and held public hearings on 2016 street improvement projects on Radisson Road, Locken Boulevard and West Robert Street.  “We had a few resident questions on the timelines of the projects and if they would be completed in 2016 and that is the plan after we get the bids,” said City Administrator Shannon Stassen.  “Other questions were about assessments and how they could be paid over time. We spread them out over years and are about 20 percent of the project.”  The Radisson Road project is over $600,000 and the city asks participation of a little less than 20 percent so the city picks up 80 percent of the bill which allows Crookston to ask for participation and to continue to replace streets as needed and keep them in condition as Pat Kelly evaluates them each year.
The council approved an agreement with the Minnesota Commissioner of Transportation for airport maintenance and operation for 2016-2017.

 

CROOKSTON WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE DISCUSSES TREE REPLACEMENT IN THE CITY

The Crookston Ways and Means Committee met after the council meeting and discussed tree replacement.  “We have been successful and had good feedback on adding trees to the community after we lost many in the tornado so we keep replacing and adding by the Crookston Sports Center and along the old Highway 75 entrance by RiverView,” said Stassen.  “They will be noticed more in the spring when the leaves come out so we continue to improve the neighborhoods.” Funds for the new trees comes from the Pest and Forestry fund.

 

MR. CHS COMPETITION TO BEHELD ON SUNDAY WITH NINE SENIOR BOYS COMPETING

The annual Mr. CHS Competition is set for Sunday, February 14 at 1:30 p.m. in the Crookston High School  Auditorium.  The event is a fundraiser for the student council.   There will be nine senior boys competing for the title, Guthrie Dingmann, Isaac Westlake, Patrick Deng, Cody Wardner, Kyle Stegman, Adam Huglen, Tim Cymbaluk, Zach Lutz, and Doug Larsen.  Judges are Crookston Police officer Don Rasicot, some teachers and Josh Hardy will be the master of ceremonies and will keep it lively so it will be enjoyable for everyone.
Tickets are at available at the door for $5.  Doors open at 1:00 p.m.

 

 

CROOKSTON PIRATE BASKETBALL TEAMS TO PLAY TRF IN COACHES VS CANCER NIGHT ON FRIDAY

The Crookston Pirate and Thief River Falls Prowler basketball teams will be participating in Coaches Versus Cancer with at with a double header at the Crookston High School Gymnasium on Friday, February 9.  The Crookston Pirate Boys will play Thief River Falls at 6:00 p.m. and the girls will play at 7:30.  Everyone is invited to wear pink or a color of choice to represent a form of cancer important to them.  From 5:15 to 8:00 p.m. there will be a raffle and silent auction of donated items like one night stay at Cobblestone  Motel, Crookston Inn and AmericInn, a pool party at AmericInn,  Happy Joes donated four large pizzas and five Little Joes, the Grand Theatre donated four movie passes, Widman’s Candy donated a candy platter and KROX is donating a Mall of America fun pack with passes to the amusement park mini golf. 
They will be selling Crookston Pirate pink t-shirts, puppy chow, heart shaped cookies and paper to create an airplane for a halftime contest. 
There will be a drawing for an autographed basketball from the Crookston boys and girls teams and Thief River Falls boys and girls teams.  
Halftime activities include an airplane throw, bleacher run, three point contest, and balls thrown out during timeouts.  Winners of the raffle and silent auction will be announced at halftime of the girls game.  Everyone is welcome to the evening of basketball entertainment and raising money for cancer on Friday night in the Crookston High School gym.

 

 

 

 

MONDAY - FEBRUARY 8, 2016

CITY OF CROOKSTON TO REMOVE SNOW DOWNTOWN TONIGHT AND TUESDAY NIGHT

The City of Crookston will be clearing snow from the downtown streets on the East/West streets starting Monday night into Tuesday morning and on the North/South streets Tuesday night into Wednesday morning.  Please try to park in off street parking spots to allow the city crews to clear all the snow in downtown Crookston.

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH NAMES DALLAS AUNE THE EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR

Registered Respiratory Therapist Dallas Aune is popular with RiverView Health patients. According to co-worker Mary Ann Boushee, when patients return for further care they specifically ask for him because he goes above and beyond to make the patients and their families have the best experience possible at RiverView. He is also popular with his peers and was recently named the 2015 Employee of the Year by those that work beside him every day and describe him as “efficient, a great teacher, kind, professional and a team player.’’
“When you hear Dallas in a room with a patient, he does more than treat their diagnosis, he creates a personal bond with every patient he touches that does not go unnoticed,’’ said Annie Waldal, Inpatient Unit Director. “RiverView has truly been blessed with his skills, knowledge and amazing approach to treating patients.’’
Aune has been at RiverView for four years. He also worked in the Care Center as a CNA back in 2001. His wife, Rachel, works in the Inpatient Unit as a nurse. They have two children, 2-year-old twins Addisyn and Ava.
“I am deeply honored to have been selected as RiverView Health’s Employee of the year,’’ Aune stated. “I get to work with some of the finest departments and they all deserve recognition for the hard work they put forth. I would like to thank RiverView Health as a whole; it’s truly an amazing place to work.
RiverView has some of the most exceptional employees an organization could have and to be singled out and chosen for this award is truly humbling.”
According to another nomination in Aune’s honor, he is known to “jump right in and help, even if it is not part of his job description. Dallas is always willing to teach us. And he does so with enthusiasm.’’
It’s that willingness to always help and enthusiasm to serve that makes Aune the perfect Employee of the Year.  “Again I want to say how grateful I am to receive this award, especially knowing that I work every day with people who are equally deserving,’’ he shared. “However I am even more grateful for the opportunity to be a health care professional. I consider it a privilege to be able to help our patients while they are sick or healing. While awards are wonderful to receive, just knowing that you have helped a patient is truly rewarding enough.’’


Dallas Aune (left) receives the 2015 Employee of the Year award from the Chair of RiverView’s Rewards and Recognition Team Jason King.

 

 

CROOKSTON CITY COUNCIL AND WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE TO MEET TONIGHT

The Crookston City Council meets tonight at 7:00 in the Crookston City Hall council chambers.  The consent agenda includes the disbursements of bills in the amount of $434,972.43.
The council will be asked to pass a resolution to enter into an agreement for airport maintenance and operations with the State of Minnesota Commissioner of Transportation for years 2016-2017.  Public hearings will be held on the street improvements for Radisson Road, Locken Boulevard, and West Robert Street.  A resolution to order the preparation of plan specifications for 2016 street improvements is up for approval.  
The meeting is open to the public. 
The Crookston Ways and Means Committee will meet following the council meeting.

 

 

CROOKSTON SCHOOL DISTRICT HOLDS EARLY CHILDHOOD SCREENING, WILL HOLD A SUMMIT IN APRIL

The Crookston School District held the Early Childhood screening for three to five year olds last week with 83 kids participating. “We had a good crowd with many professionals to conduct the screening and out of the 83 we had seven referrals so we are looking to get out information for parents to prepare their children for kindergarten,” said Denice Oliver, Washington School Principal. “We will look at the children with referrals for specific conditions like vision, hearing, emotional, social or many different things that the children could use help with.  Staff will follow up with the children to see how they are doing.”  For anyone who did not get screened they will screen any child who will start kindergarten when they register. 

The Early Childhood Summit, for early childhood educators and professionals, has been set for April 28. “Anyone who works with early childhood children comes to the Summit,” said Oliver. “Katy Smith is the speaker and she is the first Early Childhood Educator in Minnesota to be the teacher of the year so it is great to have her come and speak.” Anyone who works with young children should attend and if you’re interested in attending the Early Childhood Summit call Washington School at 281-2762.

 

 

 

SUNDAY - FEBRUARY 7,  2016

MNDOT ADVISES NO TRAVEL IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA

The Minnesota Department of Transportation no travel advisement in northwestern Minnesota has been expanded to include Beltrami, Clearwater, Hubbard and northern Cass counties.
MnDOT snowplows have been pulled off area highways for their own safety and motorists are recommended to avoid all unnecessary travel as blizzard conditions and dangerous winds have dramatically reduced visibility to less than 250 feet at times.
The advisory now includes the following counties:
· Beltrami
· Northern Cass County
· Clearwater
· Hubbard
· Kittson
· Marshall
· Pennington
· Polk
· Red Lake
· Norman

The no travel advisement will remain in effect until conditions improve. Motorists should remember to:

Check road conditions at www.511mn.org or call 511; it takes time to get roads back to good driving conditions.
Be patient and remember snowplows are working to improve road conditions for your trip.
Stay back at least five car lengths behind the plow, far from the snow cloud.
Stay alert for snowplows that turn or exit frequently and often with little warning. They may also travel over centerlines or partially in traffic to further improve road conditions.
Slow down to a safe speed for current conditions. Snowplows typically move at slower speeds.
For additional tips on safe winter driving, go to www.mndot.gov/workzone
For updated information on road conditions, visit www.511mn.org or call 511.

 

 

SATURDAY - FEBRUARY 6,  2016

NORTHWEST MINNESOTA IN A BLIZZARD WARNING FROM SUNDAY TO MONDAY MORNING

(Updated 9:30 a.m. Sunday)
A blizzard warning remains in effect until 6:00 a.m. on Monday.  Blizzard conditions will remain throughout the day Sunday and diminish by 6:00 a.m. on Monday.  The National Weather Service in Grand Forks expects one to three inches of snow combined with 55 miles per hour will cause whiteout conditions with significant drifting likely, especially in open areas. 
Travel is expected to be very difficult.
Do not travel during the storm.  If you must travel, have a winter survival kit with you.  If you get stranded, stay with your vehicle. 
Stay tuned to KROX Radio (1260 AM and 105.7 FM), online at www.kroxam.com for more information.  For weather cancellations and postponements go to KROX's weather cancellation page by clicking here.

The forecast for Crookston and the area is below -

Sunday-
A chance of rain and snow before 1:00 p.m., then snow is likely the rest of the afternoon with areas of blowing snow after 1:00 p.m. It will be cloudy, with a temperature rising to near 35 by noon, then falling to around 22 during the remainder of the day. Windy, with a north northwest wind 25 to 30 mph increasing to 30 to 35 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 46 mph. Total daytime snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

Tonight
Snow is likely, mainly before 7:00 p.m. with areas of blowing snow. It will be cloudy with a low around 10. It will be windy, with a north northwest wind 25 to 35 mph, with gusts as high as 45 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Monday
A 20 percent chance of snow before 10:00 a.m. with patchy blowing snow. It will be partly sunny, with a high near 10. It will be blustery, with a north wind 25 to 30 mph, with gusts as high as 35 mph.

 

 

 

FRIDAY - FEBRUARY 5,  2016

RIVERVIEW HEALTH TO PARTICIPATE IN GIVING HEARTS DAY, FEBRUARY 11

The RiverView Foundation is gearing up for one of the organization’s biggest events – Giving Hearts Day, February 11. Giving Hearts Day is a 24-hour, on-line give-a-thon for RiverView and other non-profits through the Dakota Medical Foundation (DMF).
In 2015 the Foundation raised nearly $100,000 in the 24-hour timeframe pushing the Foundation to a total of more than $519,000 raised in eight years of the event; or more specifically eight, 24 hour days.
This year marks the ninth annual DMF Giving Hearts Day match program. DMF and other generous donors will match, dollar for dollar, online contributions to the RiverView Foundation of $10 or more up to $15,000. The match funding through the Giving Hearts Day program is only available on Thursday, February 11 (12:00 a.m. – 11:59 p.m.). Donations must be made online at www.impactgiveback.org.  Links will also be provided on the RiverView homepage at www.riverviewhealth.org and the KROX website at www.kroxam.com
Many projects have been made possible at RiverView Health through the years thanks to the generosity of those donating on Giving Hearts Day. Meaningful programs and funds have been established through Giving Hearts Day, such as a miscarriage support program and a Kiwanis Children’s Fund; and many purchases have been made, including defibrillators, state of the art CT and MRI diagnostic equipment, Inpatient beds, materials and equipment for the renovation of the Cardiac Rehab/Radiology procedure room and central monitor and telemetry monitors for the ER Bays, just to name a few.
The Foundation Board has determined that undesignated 2016 Giving Hearts Day contributions will go to the SimPad System and CPR mannequins for “Life Saving” training, a Whirlpool tub for the Care Center, and an Audiometer for Rehab Services – Speech Therapy.
If you would like to help the Foundation with its mission of assisting with RiverView Health’s most critical needs that provide the highest level of benefits to the most patients, please make a personal donation on Giving Hearts Day and let others know the importance RiverView Health has had in your life by asking them to make an online contribution, as well.
For more information about the Giving Hearts Day program, contact RiverView Foundation Director Kent Bruun at
kbruun@riverviewhealth.org or by calling 218-281-9249. Or, if you would like assistance with your online donation, stop by Bruun’s office, located near the RiverView Cafeteria, and he will take your information in a secure, confidential setting and input the information for you.


 

 

CROOKSTON SCHOOL BOARD TO MEET ON MONDAY, JIM MULLIGAN TO RETIRE

The Crookston School Board meeting for Monday has been cancelled.

The Crookston School Board will meet on Monday at 5:00 p.m. in the Crookston High School choir/orchestra room. Visitors are welcome to bring their concerns at the beginning of the meeting or at the end.  The agenda includes the resignation letter from Jim Mulligan special education teacher at the high school.  Salary lane requests will be considered.
Katlyn Rajchel will be employed as a substitute kindergarten aide at Washington School.  Interns for the food service director and activities director will be approved.  The list for substitute para professionals will be submitted.  A school representative and school board representative will be chosen for the Minnesota High School League.  Superintendent Chris Bates will report on the pre-kindergarten legislation.  The meeting is open to the public. 
A working session will be held after the meeting in the district office.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON MAN CHARGED WITH CRIMINAL VEHICULAR HOMICIDE IN THE DEATH OF HIS WIFE MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT

44 year old Corey Reitmeier, of Crookston, is being charged with criminal vehicular homicide in the death of his wife Wendy when their motorcycle hit a deer in September 26, 2015 according to the Polk County Attorney's office.  He will appear in district court in Crookston on February 11.  The charge stems from the accident on Polk County Highway 57.  A 911 caller reported the accident and said they could have been drinking during the motorcycle ride after a gathering at Huot Park.  Highway Patrolman Millette did not smell an alcohol odor on Corey Reitmeier at the scene, but a bottle of liquor was found in a saddle bag on the bike along with a drinking cup.  Reitmeier was taken to RiverView Hospital for treatment where he consented to a blood test for alcohol which was found to be 0.186.   Reitmeier, was taken to Altru Hospital in Grand Forks for injuries sustained in the accident and was interviewed by highway patrolmen later in the week.

 

 

33 YEAR OLD WINGER MAN ARRESTED FOR A BURGLARY AT UNION LAKE

The Polk County Sheriff's Office received a call on a burglary in progress on Union Lake at 18637 North Shore Drive on Monday evening.  Christopher Allen Gadbaw, 33 of Winger, was arrested for second degree burglary.  A permanent fish house on Union Lake near the residence was also burglarized.  At this time the Polk County Sheriff's Office is attempting to locate an owner in order to investigate further.  It is not know if the burglaries are related at this time.  If anyone had a fish house burglarized on Union Lake they ask that you contact them as soon as possible.

 

 

UMC TO HOST THE WESTERN MINNESOTA REGIONAL SCIENCE FAIR ON SATURDAY

The 67th Western Minnesota Regional Science Fair will take place on the campus of the University of Minnesota Crookston on Saturday, February 6 in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. Minnesota Science Fairs are for youth in grades 6-12. The public is invited to view the exhibits from 10:30am-11:30 a.m. in Bede Ballroom and an awards ceremony will take place beginning at 2:30 p.m in Kiehle Auditorium.
Sixteen projects will be selected to advance to the state competition and the winner at the regional level will compete in the international competition. Exhibit set up will begin the day of the science fair at 7:30 a.m. with judging beginning at 9:30. The Western Minnesota Region is one of the eight regions in Minnesota and includes the counties of Big Stone, Becker, Clay, Grant, Mahnomen, Norman, Ottertail, Polk, Traverse and Wilkin.  Polk County Commissioner Nick Nicholas will be observing the Science Fair as well as saying a few words before the awards ceremony. 
The Western Minnesota Regional Science Fair is sponsored by the University of Minnesota Crookston Math, Science, and Technology Department, The American Crystal Sugar Company, Simplot, AURI, TMEE, Ltd (Crookston Pet Clinic), and LeBlanc Realty.  In addition, the Western Minnesota Regional Science Fair received funding from the University of Minnesota Extension Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships to support the creation of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) clubs with the goal of entering projects in the Western Minnesota Regional Science Fair.
For additional information about the Western Minnesota Regional Science Fair, contact Associate Professor Katy Smith at 218-281-8262 or visit the website for the science fair at www.umcrookston.edu/sciencefair
The annual State Science & Engineering Fair is for students in grades 6-12. It is the culmination of Regional Science Fairs occurring throughout the state. Middle school students may participate with a project, a research paper or both; high school students may participate with a project. High school students wishing to present a research paper compete in the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium (JSHS). In 2016, JSHS will be held April 2-3 and State Science & Engineering Fair will be held April 3-5. To learn more, visit http://www.mnmas.org

 

 

 

UMC AND NWSA ALUMNI AND FRIENDS ARE INVITED TO A SOCIAL IN MESA ARIZONA ON FEBRUARY 19

Alumni and community friends of the Northwest School of Agriculture (NWSA) and the University of Minnesota Crookston will gather for a social on Friday, February 19, 2016, at Terrace Green at ViewPoint Resort, 640 North Hawes Road, Mesa, Arizona. The annual alumni social begins at 11:30 a.m. and will run until 3 p.m. Lunch will be served at noon for $15 per person. 
Brandy Chaffee, chief development officer, Development and Alumni Relations, will host this year's social and Chancellor Fred Wood will bring greetings from the Crookston campus. 
If you are interested in attending the Arizona Social, please call Sue Dwyer at the Alumni Office at 218-281-8401 by February 12, or e-mail sdwyer@umn.edu to confirm attendance. Disability accommodations are available upon request.

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY - FEBRUARY 4,  2016

POLK COUNTY TO CRACK DOWN ON AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES THIS SUMMER AT COUNTY LAKES

The Polk County Task Force on Aquatic Invasive Species met recently and Polk County Commissioner Joan Lee participated in the discussion on programs being implemented to help keep the county safe from invasive species.  Lee said they are trying to educate the residents on the laws. “We are trying to make sure that boaters know that they need to drain their boats and bait boxes and we are looking to get an intern for the summer to monitor the different lakes and with the zebra mussels found in the Red River we are not sure what that entails,” said Lee. “We are going to make zebra mussel containers for the different lakes for the intern to check and we will set up cameras on the bigger boat ramps on the lake to ensure people take responsibility to make sure the lakes stay clean from the invasive species that are out there.”
It is unlawful to transport Eurasion Watermilfoil, purple Loosestrife, Curley Leaf Pondweed, Zebra Mussel, Rusty Crayfish, Spiny Waterflea and Faucet Snail.


 

 

KROX TALKS WITH CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR, LEAH KENT.  SHE SAYS THERE ARE 63 SCHOLARSHIPS FOR SENIORS IN THE OFFICE!

This is National School Counseling Week in Minnesota so declared by Governor  Mark Dayton.  Leah Kent is the high school counselor in Crookston and serves as the chairman of the Northwest Minnesota Counselors Association. “We do a lot of things in the background, academically, scheduling, registration, we make sure they have enough credits to graduate, and meet NCAA requirements, college career readiness including scholarships, college visits along with personal and social concerns to help the climate of our building,” said Kent who also helps students explore career options and improve workforce readiness. 

Now is the time to look at scholarships for seniors. “We have 63 scholarships available in the Crookston High School office and students have been sent notices that applications are available on all scholarships,” said Kent.  “The students think it is time consuming if they have to write an essay, but some only are an application. I tell them that if they spent an hour writing a 500 word essay for a $500 scholarship, it will be the best paying job they will have.” A lot of scholarships are in specific fields like health care, construction trades, two year and four year schools and Kent said parents should encourage their seniors to come stop by her office at the list.

 

 

 

UMC STUDENT CHAPTER OF THE WILDLIFE SOCIETY NAMED BEST STUDENT CHAPTER IN NORTH CENTRAL SECTION

The Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society at the University of Minnesota Crookston (students pictured above) received the Best Student Chapter of the Year Award from the North Central Section of The Wildlife Society.   The North Central Section is made up of the eight Midwestern states from Ohio to Minnesota containing 27 student chapters. 
The award was presented at the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan held January 24-27. Professor John Loegering, the Chapter advisor, accepted the award on behalf of the students. The award also includes a $1000 travel grant for a future professional meeting. 
The application, prepared by 2014-2015 President Alisha Mosloff, a senior from Thief River Falls, majoring in natural resources, details the club’s activities and their opportunities to grow as natural resources professionals. Various chapter activities are organized to allow members the opportunity to meet regional professionals while gaining work-related experience. 
These included bud capping pines at Itasca State Park, walleye netting and handicap deer hunt at Rydell National Wildlife Refuge, tree planting at Chippewa National Forest, duck banding at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, as well as others.  In addition, the chapter hosted over a dozen other student chapters at the North Central Section student conclave last April.  Student Conclaves provide students with a weekend of skills building, scientific presentations, and networking opportunities.
Student chapter activities are heavily focused on the hands-on aspects of wildlife and habitat management.  Chapter efforts range from assisting Minnesota DNR with owl and goshawk surveys in the spring (Beltrami Island State Forest) to bud capping/tree planting and burning of prairie lands at a local natural history area to reduce Aspen encroachment. “The students were an active, energetic, and dynamic chapter last year and the level of engagement showed in their annual report to the section,” Loegering says. “It is wonderful for the University of Minnesota Crookston to be recognized as a regional leader.”

Background
The North Central Section presents the Student Chapter of the Year award to an outstanding student chapter each year.  The goal of the award is to encourage and recognize exceptional achievements by Section student chapters.  Active and effective student chapters are needed to achieve The Wildlife Society’s goals, many of which are best addressed at the state/provincial or local level.  Student chapters also strengthen the Society’s membership recruitment and retention efforts by providing opportunities for member involvement in Society activities.  The Student Chapter of the Year award pays tribute to this important unit of The Wildlife Society.


John Loegering, left, accepts the Best Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society Award at the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference.

 

 

INVEST FORWARD DONATION TO RIVERVIEW HEALTH TO BE USED FOR ED VITAL MONITORS

Did you know that on average between 500 and 600 patients are seen each month in RiverView Health’s Emergency Department? Invest Forward recently made a commitment to help assure that those patients are safely monitored by donating to the RiverView Foundation’s Emergency Department (ED) Vital Monitoring Project.
After reviewing the prioritized needs of RiverView Health, the Foundation Board of Directors set its focus on the three vital monitors project. In addition to Invest Forward’s contribution, profits from the 12th Annual RiverView Foundation Golf Classic, to be held June 13, will also be designated to the project. Donors are also invited to make a charitable contribution supporting this patient focused project on the Foundation’s upcoming ninth annual Giving Hearts Day event February 12. The cost of the three vital monitors is estimated at $28,000. 
The state-of-the-art monitors are mobile units placed at the bedside of patients in the ED exam rooms. The units allow for more efficient and accurate vital sign readings of patients, such as cardiac rhythms, patient temperature and other vital sign measurements that are recorded in the patient's electronic medical record. “The vital monitor upgrades are an essential component to the Emergency Department being able to deliver safe care and appropriately monitor our patients ,’’ said Foundation Director Kent Bruun. “Invest Forward’s commitment to RiverView Health and the community is so valuable to RiverView’s mission to deliver a healthcare experience that consistently exceeds patients’ expectations.’’
Bill Markovich, financial advisor at Invest Forward, said he and his colleagues are happy to be a part of this project. “At Invest Forward we believe it is imperative to invest in our communities. We feel healthcare touches the lives of everyone in the community and are grateful to have partnered with the RiverView Foundation on this project that will benefit so many patients.’’
For more information on this project, contact Bruun at kbruun@riverviewhealth.org or 218-281-9249. Or to donate to the project on Giving Hearts Day – February 12 from 12:00 am to 11:59 pm – go to www.impactgiveback.org and search for RiverView Foundation or click on the link on RiverView’s webpage at www.riverviewhealth.org.  


Stephanie LeDuc, Invest Forward financial advisor; Kent Bruun, RiverView Foundation director and Bill Markovich, Invest Forward financial advisor.

 

 

WEDNESDAY - FEBRUARY 3,  2016

REMODELING AT THE POLK COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER IS ON TARGET, COMMISSIONERS THINK ABOUT MED FLIGHT CONTRACT

Polk County Commissioners learned on Tuesday that the remodeling at the Justice Center is moving ahead and on schedule. “The public health and attorney spaces are on schedule and should get a punch list next Tuesday,” said facilities manager Mark Dietz.  “Carpet is being laid and they will be moving into their space in April when it is ready.” 
They had a change order to install safety measures and card readers to track the people going into the area at a cost of $77,152.  “It is a security issue, but we are a little bit under budget at this time,” said Dietz.

Polk County Commissioners approved the purchase of a retro-reflectometer for $7,586.75 for the highway department and the purchase of a trailer for $24,339,00 from RDO Equipment in Grand Forks.  An engineering pickup was purchased from Lithia in Grand Forks for $27,946.00 to replace the pickup that was totaled in an accident in June.  Rachel Freund, a UMC student, will serve an internship with Polk County Public Health. 
The commissioners accepted a grant of $152,000.00 from the Department of Human Services to Polk County Social Services for community programs with the Northwestern Mental Health Center.  The county paid SHI International Corporation $12,150.00 for Microsoft Licensing software for the IT department.

Staff from Valley Med Flight Incorporated came before the Polk County Commissioners with a proposal to provide services and affordable ambulatory health care for county residents.  Robert Miller of Valley Med Flight said his proposal would provide every resident of Polk County the service of air ambulance transport from any facility. The patient would have minimal cost out of pocket, because the county membership would cover the service.  “The service is available now to the residents,” said Miller. “We have a helicopter in Roseau that covers the region and a base in Grand Forks that serves 24 hours a day.  Payments come from insurance and the residents don’t pay much out of pocket usually less than $500.”  Valley Med Flight has 10 bases from Sidney, Montana to Escanaba, Michigan and they primarily cover North Dakota and Northwest Minnesota.
The Commissioners took no action as they have budgeted for 2016, but they will study the proposal that would cost the county $94,500 a year which is $3 per citizen.   Valley Med Flight provides transport services to the county residents now when requested to any medical facility.

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH IN CROOKSTON TO HOST A BASIC FIRST AID CLASS ON THURSDAY

RiverView Health in Crookston will host an education course on February 4 for individuals interested in basic first aid. The program, developed by the American Heart Association, is open to the general public. Participants in this First Aid Course will learn to provide first aid for acute injuries and sudden illnesses such as burns, bites, poisoning, and seizures. This course is excellent for day care providers, schools or individuals.
The four-hour class will be held from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. in Meeting Room 4 at RiverView Health. The cost of the class, including the book and card, is $45. The American Heart Association is not responsible for any fees charged for this course.
The class is an American Heart Association (AHA) Community Training Center affiliated course. Contracted Community Training Centers (CTCs) and their affiliated sites are the only facilities permitted to offer AHA courses to the public and professionals through their affiliated instructors and programs.
To register or for more information on this class or other courses offered through the CTC, call 218-281-9405 or 1-800-743-6551, extension 9405.
The American Heart Association strongly promotes knowledge and proficiency in all AHA courses and has developed instructional materials for this purpose. Use of these materials in an educational course does not represent course sponsorship by the AHA. Any fees charged for such a course, except for a portion of fees needed for AHA course materials do not represent income to the AHA.

 

 

SECOND GRADERS AT HIGHLAND SCHOOL ENJOY UND SPACE STUDIES PROGRAM

Second graders at Highland School were treated to a University of North Dakota space studies program on Friday afternoon with their teachers Kari Heppner and Tina Leach. Staff from the Space Grant Consortium at UND presented a program on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and helped prepare the students for when they host travel to UND to talk with an astronaut in space in March.  “We are getting the youngsters enthusiastic, so in March they can talk to the astronauts. They are learning about rockets, space travel, and they are learning to work together,” said Merrisa Saud of UND.  “We study a lot of planetary science, rockets, human exploration at the space program at UND. I came from Boston to study the program which is the best in the country.”
Second grade teacher Kari Heppner organized the program to come to Highland School.  “We have brought the UND students and people from NASA and we made a capsule and a parachute and simulated the action from space,” said Heppner.  “They had lots of rocks and space items, a space helmet along with other fun stuff.  They are getting excited to ask questions of the astronauts in March and tour the UND space facilities.”


           The students enjoying the STEM program put on by the UND Space Consortium

 

 

NORTHWEST MINNESOTA SNOWPLOW OPERATORS TO GET ADDITIONAL TRAINING

More than 130 snow fighters in northwestern Minnesota will complete additional snowplow training over the next month using a state-of-the-art snowplow simulator that can create nearly any roadway emergency, traffic or weather condition without ever leaving the shop.
In addition to MnDOT snowplow operators, county and city crews from across northwestern Minnesota will also take part in the training. The simulator site schedule/locations are as follows:
· Feb. 2-3, 9-10 – Bemidji
· Feb. 17-18 – Roseau
· Feb. 23-24 – Thief River Falls
· Mar. 1-2 – Crookston
· Mar. 8-9 – Walker 

The mobile unit is housed in a 32-foot trailer, with a classroom slide out, and replicates the view from inside a plow using two 55-inch monitors. “The controls are the actual ones used on a MnDOT snowplow,” said Andrew Kubista, driving simulator program manager. “The simulator is where we can make the mistakes, learn from them and there are no damages,”
The simulator software can be programmed for all types of situations, from blizzard conditions to roundabouts and allows drivers to practice hundreds of plowing scenarios, from two-lane highways and rural areas, to interstates and city streets, in daylight and nighttime.
Dashboard controls adjust the virtual mirrors, strobe lights, snowplow blades, salt spreader and ventilation. Drivers must maintain an awareness of the vehicle, the road and the environment in front of them at all times. Conditions can be changed at any time by the trainer. The simulator also focuses on another dangerous everyday hazard - other motorists. Trainers can control actions of other vehicles driving near the snowplows during the simulations and recreate real-life motorist behaviors.
The simulators reduce training costs by not using real trucks and fuel. The drivers are also prepared for weather conditions that would be difficult and dangerous to replicate in a real truck experience.

 

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH'S LORI HEFTA EARNS POSTURAL RESTORATION CERTIFICATE

Lori Hefta, RiverView Health physical therapist, recently earned a Postural Restoration Certificate (PRC) through the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI). Hefta completed multiple advanced PRI courses, demonstrated a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRC application, and successfully participated in both clinical and analytical testing.
The Postural Restoration Institute established this credentialing process in 2004 as a way to recognize and identify individuals with advanced training, extraordinary interest and devotion to the science of postural adaptations, asymmetrical patterns and the influence of polyarticular chains of muscles on the human body as defined by the Postural Restoration Institute. Postural Restoration Certified (PRC) is available to physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, occupational therapists and chiropractors who have completed the requirements.
PRC professionals offer a unique approach to physical medicine called Postural Restoration. This approach addresses underlying biomechanics which can often lead to symptoms of pain and dysfunction. All mechanical influences on the body that restrict movement and contribute to improper joint and muscle position are considered, examined, and assessed. Manual and non-manual techniques are utilized to restore proper alignment of the body while proper respiratory dynamics are considered. Treatment encompasses prevention and lifetime integration for long-term successful outcomes.
Hefta is the only Riverview employee with this certification, and said she is excited to practice the treatment techniques and tests of the Postural Restoration Institute.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS THAT ATTENDED RYLA CAMP HONORED AT ROTARY MEETING

Local high school students who attended the 2015 Rotary Youth Leadership Academy Summer Camp in July at the University of Minnesota Crookston, were honored by the Rotary Club of Crookston during their noontime meeting on January 27 at the Crookston Inn. 
The week long camp engages students activities such as creating a personal mission statement, the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, FISH!, the Meyers Briggs Personality Assessment, Diversity, Validation, Random Acts of Kindness, and other activities in preparation for college and careers.


Jordan Bengtson, Zachary Lutz, Leah Trostad, Lorna Hollowell (Rotary Club President), Haley Roed, Brooke Bergeron, and Marietta Geist.

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY - FEBRUARY 2,  2016

17 YEAR OLD EAST GRAND FORKS BOY LEADS CROOKSTON POLICE ON HIGH SPEED CHASE THROUGH TOWN THEN ARRESTED

On Monday (February 1) evening at about 8:55 PM the Crookston Police Department responded to a report of an intoxicated driver all over the road; the driver was currently southbound on University Avenue near the railroad crossing.  A Crookston Police Officer observed the vehicle heading south on University and turned around to follow it.  A second  officer had stationed his squad car in the Subway parking lot.  That officer observed the suspect vehicle travelling east on 6th Street at a speed of 45 mph in a 30 mph zone as indicated on the squad radar.  The suspect vehicle turned south from West 6th Street onto Main Street and began to increase in speed above the 30 mph limit.  Officers activated their emergency lights and siren in the 400 block of North Main Street.  The suspect refused to stop and continued to increase in speed as it travelled south through downtown Crookston.
The suspect turned onto Old Highway 75 near the Crookston Fire Department.  As the suspect travelled southwest it reached speeds of 70-80 mph in a 45 mph zone and crossed the center line and fog line several times.  The suspect turned east onto Ingersoll Avenue where a Crookston Police Officer performed a PIT maneuver disabling the vehicle.  The suspect was taken into custody without incident, was not injured, was transported to the Northwest Regional Corrections Center for DWI testing and later transported to the Juvenile Detention Center. 
The driver is a 17 year old male from East Grand Forks, MN.  The vehicle is a 2004 Grey Chevrolet Impala registered to the suspect’s step-mother, also of East Grand Forks.  The speed at the time of the PIT was about 22 mph.  There was minimal damage to both vehicles; both were drivable.  Charges are pending as the investigation continues.

 

 

CITY OF CROOKSTON OUTBID FOR SAWYER BROWN IN 2016, WILL TRY TO GET THEM IN 2017, LOOKING FOR ANOTHER BAND

Crookston is still looking for a band to perform during Ox Cart Days after losing the bid for Sawyer Brown. “We still have hope to get them in 2017,” said Crookston City Administrator Shannon Stassen.  We were in a competitive bid with a city in Wyoming and they were ahead of us and then along came a larger bid for the show in June in a closer community so that eliminated Crookston so we will work toward 2017.”  Stassen said they have a list of different bands that would be fit for the money and type of band they want to bring to town. “We are looking for the right fit for Crookston and the area so we will continue to work,” said Stassen

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH HANDS OUT OVER $270,000 IN INCENTIVE BONUSES AFTER A $3.7 MILLION POSITIVE MARGIN IN 2015

January ended on a positive note for RiverView Health employees as a majority of the staff received incentive compensation bonuses based on RiverView’s Fiscal Year 2015 performance. But the week also included a big win for the entire organization – the report at the Riverview Healthcare Association’s January 25 annual meeting that 2015 marked a great turnaround for the organization. “This has been a celebratory week at RiverView Health,’’ said President/CEO Carrie Michalski on Friday. “Monday we were able to report to our Association membership that we had ended 2015 with a $3.7 million positive margin. As Crookston’s sole community hospital and emergency services provider, this is good news for RiverView Health, but it is critical news for Crookston and the patients we serve in the region. As a non-profit, all of these resources will stay and be reinvested in the communities we serve.’’
In 2015 RiverView offered, for the first time, performance based incentive compensation opportunities to the entire team. More than 70 percent of the team achieved those goals and reaped the rewards of helping to deliver a healthcare experience that consistently exceeds patients’ expectations. On Friday, a total of $270,000 of incentive compensation was included in the paychecks of 235 RiverView employees from 22 different departments for meeting or exceeding individual and team based goals.
“Our employees are deeply committed to the care they provide and they are equally committed to being wise stewards of limited resources,’’ Michalski shared. “This team works together and has achieved what few rural critical access hospitals achieved over the past twelve months. They provided care for more patients, and implemented new programs and services without increasing the cost of delivering that care. I am so grateful to work alongside this group of highly qualified health care professionals.’’

 

 

POLK COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH TO OFFER FEBRUARY FITNESS FEVER EVENTS

Got the winter blues?  Well, we have the cure for you!   Polk County Public Health and the Polk County Wellness Coalition, along with our amazing community partners and volunteers, are excited to share this year’s events for February Fitness Fever!  Every Sunday in February, FREE fitness related activities will be offered in Crookston, open for the entire region!
Being active in the winter can be challenging for many.  The goal of February Fitness Fever is to highlight the variety of active living choices we have available right here in our area.  We know that February Fitness Fever will provide you with the positive experiences, resources, and tools that will make it EASIER for you to get up, get out, have fun, and move your body- regardless the snow and cold!

The month’s events kick off on Sunday, February 7 from 1:00- 3:00 p.m., with FREE cross country skiing and snowshoeing at UMC.  Park in Lot A, and enter the North door at the Sargeant Student Center. Free skis and snowshoes will be available in sizes ranging from youth size four and up.  Volunteers will be present to teach and guide the novice.  It is recommended to dress in layers, as one might start skiing chilled but end up warm. There will be trail options that will appeal to both the novice and experienced cross country skier. 

Bring the family out on Valentine’s Day, February 14, to enjoy an afternoon of FREE swimming at the Crookston Community Pool.  The pool will be open from 12-3 p.m. for friends and families to come enjoy the warmth of the indoor pool.  This experience may result in many future trips to the pool for the entire family.

On Sunday, February 21, come out for FREE ice skating at the Crookston Sports Center on the main event ice arena.  Free ice skates in many sizes will be available for use for youth and adults.  If you choose not to skate, they encourage participants to stretch those muscles and increase your heart rate by taking a few laps around the indoor walking track located conveniently within the Crookston Sports Center. 

February Fitness Fever will wrap up on Sunday, February 28 with free Tae Kwon Do from 1:00-2:00 p.m at the Crookston TKD studio, located at 119 Main St. N.  Championship Tae Kwon Do will capture all ages with demonstrations and instruction. This sport will provide a great work-out utilizing a variety of punches and kicks.

Children and adults of all ages and skill levels are welcome and encouraged to attend the FREE fitness events.  Polk County Public Health and the Polk County Wellness Coalition want to thank all of their many volunteers and local sponsors who are our true champions of wellness and collaborate with us to make the healthy choice the easy choice!  Crookston is fortunate to have such a variety of opportunities that promote the health and wellness of our community members. 

Please tune in to KROX, 1260am for any cancellations or changes.  Participants may pick up their event flyers at all February Fitness Fever Events and Polk County Public Health Offices.  You can also download the FFF Flyer at the Polk County Website, www.co.polk.mn.us., and click on Public Health under Departments.   For more information, please contact Tammy Conn or Leah Winjum, at Polk County Public Health, 281-3385.  


 

 

FEBRUARY 1-5 IS NATIONAL SCHOOL COUNSELING WEEK

February 1-5 is National School Counseling Week. In Minnesota, school counseling advocates are organizing support for legislation that could help address the state’s workforce shortage and reduce one of the worst achievement gaps in the nation. The legislation, intended to expand student access to school counseling and other support services, is known as the Student Support Services Personnel Act (SF 1364/HF 2045). The bill passed the Minnesota Senate as part of its E-12 education finance bill during the 2015 legislative session, but was ultimately not included in the final budget deal.
“National School Counseling Week is an opportunity to highlight the many ways that students benefit from the services that counselors provide,” said Minnesota School Counselors Association (MSCA) President Dawnette Cigrand. “Legislators responded positively to our initiative last year, so we are going to work with other student support services groups and other stakeholders again this legislative session. Improving students’ access to counseling and support services is key to reducing the achievement gap and addressing Minnesota’s workforce shortage.”
Driving the need for better access to counseling services are concerns that students are forced to wait days and sometimes weeks to receive guidance needed to improve grades, explore potential careers, or overcome the social and emotional challenges kids face every day – a result of Minnesota’s student-to-counselor ratio of nearly 800 to 1 (nearly the worst ratio in the nation). Based on data gathered by the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), students in Minnesota have disparate access to counselors and other support services.

Research shows dramatic benefits result when students have access to comprehensive support services, including:
·  Dramatic increases in post-secondary enrollment and career readiness
·  Increased school attendance rates, ACT scores, and graduation rates
·  Decreased disciplinary action and suspension rates
·  Increased math and reading proficiency levels

School counselors say these positive impacts align closely with outcomes needed to reduce Minnesota’s achievement gap. Counselors also say their work to improve workforce readiness and help students explore career options could be a major tool in addressing the state’s impending worker shortage. According to U.S. Census data, Minnesota will face a shortage of more than 100,000 workers in five years.
“All of us have a lot of work to do to positively impact the state’s education and workforce challenges,” added Cigrand. “Ensuring that all students have improved access to support services such as school counselors is a vital piece of the puzzle that must be addressed sooner rather than later.”

About the Minnesota School Counselors Association
The Minnesota School Counselors Association represents more than 1,000 members who actively promote excellence in the school counseling profession by advocating for the resources needed to instill student success in school, home, and the broader community. For more information, please visit www.mnschoolcounselors.org.  

 

 

UMC AG ARAMA ROYALTY CROWNED AND AWARDS HANDED OUT

Royalty were crowned, students were recognized for achievement, and alumni gathered for the 41st annual Ag Arama at the University Teaching and Outreach Center at the University of Minnesota Crookston. This year's event was dedicated to the new agricultural education major and the theme for the day was "Kick the Dust Up."  


Royalty crowned included (left to right in photo): Prince Kamron Matejcek, a sophomore ag systems management major from Lakota, N.D.; Princess Madison Halvorson, a sophomore animal science major from Ogilvie; Queen Ellen Dauphinais, a senior animal science major from Parkers Prairie; and King Keith Yorek, a senior animal science major from Little Falls. 


A 2015 alumnus was honored with the True Grit Award. Luke Lundeby, an ag systems management graduate from Osnabrock, N.D. The most coveted of all awards presented at Ag Arama, the True Grit Award is dedicated to Todd Opsahl, a student in 1973-74. 


Taylor Storhoff, a senior majoring in animal science from Valley City, N.D., was honored with the Round Robin Showmanship Award. 

 

 

MONDAY - FEBRUARY 1,  2016

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL SPEECH TEAM FINISHES NINTH OUT OF 21 TEAMS IN FERGUS FALLS

The Crookston High School Speech team competed at Fergus Falls on Saturday, January 30. The speech team is coached by Phyllis Hagen and Gaye Wick and the volunteer assistant is Kathryn Hefta, and finished ninth place out of 21 teams and the individual award winners are listed below.

Red Ribbon winners include:
Merran Dingmann - Creative Expression
Isabel Rodriguez - Original Oratory
Megan Frisk - Humor Interpretation

Blue Ribbon winners include:
Emily Gillette - Dramatic Interpretation
Callie Boucher - Storytelling
Bailey Bradford - Storytelling & Humor Interpretation
Katherine Geist - Extemporaneous Reading

Medalists include:
Charles Brantner - Fourth place Extemporaneous Reading
Megan Frisk and Zachary Zanders - Fifth place Duo Interpretation


Top row left to right: Muira MacRae, Charles Brantner, Merran Dingmann
Middle row left to right: Katherine Geist, Emily Gillette, Isabel Rodriguez, Megan Frisk, Zach Sanders
Bottom row left to right: Alex MacGregor, Callie Boucher, Victoria Proulx, Bailey Bradford

 

 

UMC TO HOST SPECIAL EVENTS FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Special events in recognition of Black History Month will be held at the University of Minnesota Crookston. The community and region are encouraged to join the campus for these activities.

On Thursday, February 4, the ZuZu African Acrobats will perform at 6:30 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. Known in the United States for their appearance on “America’s Got Talent,” the six-member troupe delivers a family-friendly show blending circus arts and physical feats with high-energy dancing, driven by the rhythms of traditional and popular African music. Troupe will provide a teaser, full performance, and meet and greet. Refreshments will be served and the evening activities are free to all. For more information, visit http://zuzuacrobats.blogspot.com.

On Monday, February 22, a “Night of Expression” will be held starting with a meal and cultural display in Bede Ballroom from 4:30 to 6:30 followed by a program in Kiehle Auditorium. The evening will be a celebration showcasing Spoken Word, Steppers, African/African American music from various genres. Tributes to  Black/African Historical Figures and Celebrities, Tribal/Modern Dance, Gospel Music, and students, faculty, and staff. All guests will be entered into a drawing for door prizes. Special feature performances by the Lincoln Gospel Choir, Robbinsdale Cooper High School Step Team from Minneapolis, Minn., and the University of North Dakota Afro Fusion Dance Troupe, Grand Forks, N.D. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Cost is $12 per person or $70 for a table of 8. Children 5 and under are free. Contact Lorna Hollowell at 218-281-8580 to purchase tickets.  
To view all events taking place during Black History Month at the U of M Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/today.

Background
Americans have recognized black history annually since 1926. The commemoration originated with historian Dr. Carter G. Woodson. He established what is now known as the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History in 1915, and a year later founded the widely respected Journal of Negro History. In 1926, he began an initiative for a special week to bring national attention to the contributions of black people throughout American history. It became a month-long recognition in 1976.

 

 

MICHELLE MOEN, RIVERVIEW HEALTH OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST, EARNS CERTIFIED LYMPHEDEMA THERAPIST CERTIFICATION

Michelle Moen, RiverView Health occupational therapist, has earned the qualifications of a Certified Lymphedema Therapist (CLT). She completed 45 hours of independent study prior to attending 90 classroom hours of training at the Academy of Lymphatic Studies (ACOLS) in Palm Beach, Florida.
Graduates of ACOLS have a thorough knowledge and understanding of all aspects of Complete Decongestive Therapy. Complete Decongestive Therapy includes techniques of manual lymph drainage, compression bandaging, and measurement and fitting of medical compression garments.
Lymphedema is swelling of a body part, most often in the extremities but can occur in the face, neck, trunk, abdomen, or the genital area. Lymphedema can be the result of surgery or radiation therapy for cancer. Other conditions which can be successfully treated with Complete Decongestive Therapy include chronic venous insufficiency, post traumatic and post-surgical edema, inflammatory rheumatism, fibromyalgia, and lipedema.
Moen joins Lori Hefta, physical therapist, as the only other Certified Lymphedema Therapist at RiverView Health. Moen and Hefta will work together to coordinate care for patients of RiverView who are affected by Lymphedema.
Interested in becoming a lymphedema therapist since college, Moen had the opportunity early in her career to observe other lymphedema therapists and used compression bandaging for post-traumatic edema at her previous job.
“I’ve seen how effective lymphedema therapy can be and what an impact it can make on a patient’s life,’’ she shared. “I’m excited that I now have the training and certification needed to help serve those patients.’’

 

 

KATRINA NORDICK WRAPPING UP A GREAT FOUR YEARS AT UMC AS A STUDENT ATHLETE

It’s a year of firsts and a year of lasts for Katrina (Moenkedick) Nordick, Perham, Minn. It is her last semester at the University of Minnesota Crookston, her last season of college basketball, but for the senior forward, it’s been a season of firsts for her Golden Eagle Basketball Team, and along with it, her first year of marriage. Much of what Nordick learned growing up on a dairy farm in central Minnesota has been applied to athletics and academics. “It is about hard work and mindset,” Nordick says. “It is about succeeding and achieving and competing with yourself. I always want to be better, and I have this expectation that certain things just aren’t acceptable. “You can have an off night shooting, but that doesn’t mean you can’t rebound and play defense,” she continues. “You can always work hard on the floor.” Life is about making adjustments as you go, and Nordick learned that lesson long ago and first hand on the farm, and she has taken it into the classroom and onto the court.
Like many student athletes, Nordick knows she has to be organized and balance her academic and athletic obligations. She also relishes the relationships she has built with her professors, the campus community, and the Crookston community as well. “I have enjoyed such great support from the people of Crookston, and as an athlete, that support is something I really appreciate and will miss when I leave.”
When Nordick graduates in May, she will return to Perham to work with her brother operating the family farm. “I have taken classes in dairy production and animal science, along with a number of education classes,” she says. “I will earn an applied studies degree tailored to my interest areas in education and animal science.”
Nordick knew taking over the dairy operation was not something she wanted to do on her own. With her oldest brother taking the reins of the farm from her dad, the opportunity to work with him drew her home. “I have worked every summer during college for my brother, Kenny, and now I will have the chance to make a difference in that operation full time,” she says.  And maybe, should the opportunity present itself, Nordick might be interested in coaching. After all, she values highly what she has learned from her coaches.
Nordick came to Crookston to play basketball for Coach Mike Roysland, and he certainly has been influential both on and off the court. “When you are being recruited in high school, it is nice to be a sought after player for your basketball skills, but what was more important to me was the way Coach Roysland wanted the best for his players as individuals,” she says. “He reminds us often that he wants us each to be the best we can be, and I see that in action with all the members of our team. He wants us to play well, but he wants us to do well in life.”
There was a time Nordick didn’t think she would stick with college, but Roysland convinced her it would be worth it to stay. “Now, I am living this amazing senior basketball season,” she explains. “I am so proud of this team and this program and how far we have come. Together, we have influenced the program and we have made a difference.” They certainly have.
Being married has changed some of Nordick’s priorities from those of her peers, although, family has always been at the top of her list. “I am glad to be finishing with school, but the end of my basketball career is truly bittersweet,” she reflects. “I have loved basketball every, single day, but I know there are bigger, better things ahead. I am ready to move on to the next step, and with my husband, Josh, beside me, I am looking forward to it.”
Nordick is indeed ready with a career and a home surrounded by the people and places she loves. “I thrived on competition growing up, and there was always a game going on at home, and as a family of athletes, we could get intense,” she smiles. “I want to bring that intensity and passion to my work. I find farming rewarding, and I thrive knowing that I am passionate and excited about a career that is maybe a bit unexpected and perhaps a little out of the ordinary.
When the final buzzer sounds and the game is over, with her diploma firmly in hand, Nordick will keep playing, and no matter what, she will always play to win.


 

 

CATHEDRAL SCHOOL HOSTS THE SCIENCE MUSEUM OF MINNESOTA

The Science Museum of Minnesota paid a visit to Cathedral School to teach the students about water. Students in grades Kindergarten and 2nd learned about different forms of water.  Volunteers are shown holding different items that can be used when water is frozen and when it is not. The students in 3rd-6th grade learned what water is, where it goes, how it is used and how to care for it.  The volunteers represented different areas where water is used each day; electricity, manufacturing, personal or farming and  where that water comes from.  Students learned that each person on an average uses 750 gallons of water in a day.


Cathedral Schools try out on of the experiments during the Science Museum of Minnesota visit

 

 

SNOW SCULPTURE MADE IN CROOKSTON BY MARCIA MEINE AND HER GRANDCHILDREN


Marcia Meine and her grandchildren recently made a snow sculpture while enjoying the pleasant weather!

 

 

 

FRIDAY - JANUARY 29,  2016

ALTRU CLINIC IN CROOKSTON HOSTS THEIR WELLNESS COMMUNITY CONNECTION ON MONDAY

Altru Clinic in Crookston is set to host its monthly Community Wellness Connection on Monday, February 1 from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. in its conference room. This month’s 30 minute presentation followed by a question and answer session is focused on Endocrine/Hormonal Problems. Presenters include Dr. Makarem, internal medicine.
Call 281-9100 to register (minimum of 6) There is no charge for this session.

 

 

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL ONE ACT PLAY FINISHES THIRD AT SUB-SECTION COMPETITION

The Crookston High School One Act Play performed at the Subsection 30 competition in Ada on Thursday and took third place.  First place went to Ada-Borup and second place went to Fisher. Crookston presented, “Caution Librarians Ahead.”  Other schools performing were Norman County West, Red Lake Falls, and Fertile-Beltrami.  The Section 8A competition will be in Crookston on February 6 with Ada- Borup and Fisher performing.
Members of the cast are - Megan Frisk, Zachary Lutz, Charles Brantner, Jesse Bosquez, Shaylin Goodrich, Luisa Bernia, Grace Steiner, Jake Wagner, Maddie Everett, Kaitlin Selzler, Zach Sanders, Alex MacGregor, Alyssa Goelzer, Macy Larson, Callie Boucher, and Michelle Cuno.
Student Directors/Understudies: Gina Visness and Rachel Hefta Lights: Daphne Butler.  The team was coached by Kristi Hager.


The Crookston High School One Act play takes a selfie before awards (Picture submitted by Kristi Hager)

 

 

CROOKSTON VALLEY COOP DONATES TO RIVERVIEW HEALTH

The Crookston Valley Cooperative (CVC) understands the importance of safety for its employees, ag customers and community. So when RiverView Foundation Director Kent Bruun approached the CVC Board proposing its help in funding a decontamination project at RiverView Health, the Cooperative was all-in.
Human decontamination is the process of cleansing the human body to remove contamination by hazardous materials including chemicals, radioactive substances, and infectious material.  “The faster we can get someone cleaned off and treated the better,’’ said RiverView’s Director of Emergency Services Kristen Pearcy. “Five minutes makes a huge difference in someone’s outcome in a decontamination situation. This setup will help increase survival rates and quality of life to patients who suffer from these types of chemical exposures.’’
Through the decontamination project, RiverView now houses a decontamination shower area that is monitored, easily accessible to the Emergency Department and allows for rapid and efficient decontamination, reported Pearcy.
“This project is a
wonderful addition to the facility and to the community to help provide excellent patient care to those in need of decontamination,’’ said Pearcy.
“After Mr. Bruun approached Crookston Valley Cooperative last summer, the Board of Directors deemed it important in the industry that we are in to support the RiverView Emergency Decontamination Project,’’ said Justin Spivey, manager of Crookston Valley Cooperative. “It’s reassuring knowing it may provide added benefits in an emergency situation not only to our patrons but to the community and first responders as well."


Back row, left to right: Crookston Valley Cooperative Board Members Joel Gasper, Chris Cournia, CVC Manager Justin Spivey, and RiverView Foundation Director Kent Bruun.
Front row: CVC Board Member John Boucher, CVC Board President Trevore Brekken and Director of RiverView Health Emergency Services Kristen Pearcy. Not pictured: Christian Kiel.


 

 

TIM AND KARI MOE AND JEREMY AND SARAH HOVDE NAMED RRV EMERGING LEADERS

Tim and Kari Moe of Fisher, and Jeremy and Sarah Hovde of Fertile were recenlty named Red River Valley Emerging Leaders by the University of Minnesota Extension office.

The Moe's are West Polk County’s representatives in the Red River Valley Emerging Leadership Program. Alumni of the program from the county nominated them to take part in the program because of their involvement in their community.
Tim is geography teacher for eighth and ninth grade students at Crookston High School. He grew up on a large beef cattle (up to 1,500 head) and 200-acre corn and alfalfa farm. He also worked on his grandpa’s 1,000-acre wheat and soybean farm. Kari is a community relations specialist at Riverview Health in Crookston.
Tim and Kari have been taking part in educational sessions since November 2015. They are building skills for leadership and networking with other rural leaders from 16 counties in the region. Extension educators Lisa Hinz, Brian Fredrickson, and Jody Horntvedt are instructors for the sessions which focus on personal leadership styles, communication, community leadership, legislative issues, life balance, dealing with challenges, change, and facilitating effective meetings.

The Hovde's are East Polk County’s representatives in the Red River Valley Emerging Leadership Program. Alumni of the program from the county nominated them to take part in the program because of their involvement in their community. Jeremy is a territory sales manager for Herc-U-Lift, selling forklifts, scissorlifts, booms, racking and other warehouse material-handling equipment. Jeremy and Sarah have a hobby farm where they raise soybeans and corn. Sarah works at Encore Family Consignment and Poissant Therapy and Fitness as a physical therapy assistant. She also teaches fitness/pilates classes.
Jeremy and Sarah have been taking part in educational sessions since November 2015. They are building skills for leadership and networking with other rural leaders from 16 counties in the region. Extension educators Lisa Hinz, Brian Fredrickson, and Jody Horntvedt are instructors for the sessions which focus on personal leadership styles, communication, community leadership, legislative issues, life balance, dealing with challenges, change, and facilitating effective meetings.

The Moe’s and Hovde’s will be honored for their commitment to leadership and their community at the Emerging Leadership Program’s annual recognition banquet on Saturday, April 2 in Crookston. Family and friends are invited to join program alumni at the event. Tickets can be ordered from the Extension Regional Office in Cookston by calling 218-281-8696 -or- toll free 1-888-241-0781.

This is the 32nd year the Emerging Leadership Program has brought together individuals from across the region for training workshops. Over 1,000 leaders in northwest and west central Minnesota are alumni of the program, which was developed in 1985 to enhance the King Agassiz Program of the Red River Valley Winter Shows.
University of Minnesota Extension, with their long history of excellence in designing, delivering and evaluating leadership programs, is the primary sponsor of the Emerging Leadership Program. Additional financial support for the program comes from the Red River Valley Development Association, and from a variety of other sources including ag producer groups, electric cooperatives, community businesses, financial institutions and individuals in counties throughout northwest and west central Minnesota who contribute each year. The Emerging Leadership Program is a regional fund of the Northwest Minnesota Foundation.


    Kari and Tim Moe representing West Polk County    Sarah and Jeremy Hovde representing East Polk County

 

 

TWO CROOKSTON MEN WIN AWARDS FROM MINNESOTA CROP IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

Craig Damstrom, a promoter of international ag business; Neal Anderson, a hybrid seed corn producer; David Brule (of Crookston) a long time certified seed grower; Jonathon Olson, an organic certified seed producer and Jochum Wiersma (of Crookston), University Small Grain Specialist were honored by the members of the Minnesota Crop Improvement Association (MCIA).  The awards were presented during the MCIA Annual Meeting held January 12-13 in Fergus Falls.

Neal Anderson, David Brule and Jonathon Olson received Premier Seedsman Awards.  The award, presented annually since 1929, recognizes individuals who have demonstrated a long-term commitment to the production and promotion of high quality certified seed and have been active in the Minnesota Crop Improvement Association and their local community.

David Brule of Crookston has been involved in seed production for over 50 years. After graduating from the Northwest School of Agriculture he returned to the family farm. He has produced certified wheat and barley seed and enjoys the relationships he has developed and the people he has met in the seed business. Brule belongs to the Polk County Crop Improvement and the Minnesota Wheat Growers. Today he farms with his son Todd, producing certified wheat seed as well as soybeans, corn, sugar beets and black turtle beans. 

Jochum Wiersma of Crookston received the Honorary Premier Seedsman award, presented to individuals who demonstrate outstanding support of agriculture and MCIA but are not directly involved in the seed industry.  Wiersma is well known to many seed growers and farmers around the state. The Small Grain Specialist at the University of Minnesota has dedicated 20 years to education, research and solving problems for wheat, barley and oat producers. During his tenure Wiersma established the Red River Valley On-Farm Yield Trials. Cooperating with farmers throughout the region, these test locations provide valuable information to producers and researchers. During the growing season Wiersma spends countless hours in the field assessing variety performance. He also serves on a number of committees and is active in several academic organizations.    
In addition to the awards banquet, seed producers and processors from around the state participated in the educational program, business meeting and industry trade show.

About MCIA
Founded in 1903, MCIA continues its role as Minnesota’s official seed certification agency.  MCIA also provides a wide range of other services, including Identity Preserved grain certification, Quality Assurance programs, forage and mulch certification and native seed certification.  MCIA is an accredited organic certification agency and serves as the exclusive agent for the marketing of University of Minnesota agronomic crop varieties.


    David Brule  and   Jochum Wiersma

 

 

 

CHARLES BRANTNER IS NAMED THE JANUARY CROOKSTON ROTARY STUDENT OF THE MONTH

The Crookston Rotary Club honored Charles Brantner as the January Crookston High School student of the month. Charles Brantner is a senior at Crookston High School and his parents are Jason and Kerri Brantner and he has a younger brother Ben.
Plans after high school/college:
  “I plan to attend either Concordia in Moorhead, UND, or St. Olaf.”
Major or area(s) of interest: “I hope to double major in music along with another area that is yet to be determined.”
Areas of involvement in clubs or organizations: Band, Choir, Theater, Speech, Knowledge Bowl, Envirothon, Grand Forks Youth Symphony, UND Trombone Choir, UMC Jazz Band, Board of Deacons at First Presbyterian Church
Honors and Awards: 2015-16 MMEA All-State Symphonic Band, National Honor Society, Boys State, Honor Band (UND, St. Olaf, NWMBDA, St. Thomas)
Comments:  “I offer my thanks to the Crookston Rotary Club for this honor and the scholarship.”


Charles Brantner, the Crookston Rotary CHS Student of the Month for January is pictured with his award and with Crookston Rotary Club President Lorna Hollowell

 

 

POLK COUNTY AGREE WITH TO A THREE YEAR CONTRACT WITH THE POLK COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE AND DISPATCHER UNITS, SIX MORE TO GO

Polk County Commissioners met this week and labor agreement with the Teamsters #320 Dispatchers unit. “We approved the labor agreement with the Polk County Sheriff’s office and dispatchers units. There are some concerns about the health insurance going forward, but we were able to come to a three year agreement at three percent each year,” said Commissioner Craig Buness, of Crookston.  “We have six more contracts to negotiate. I think one will revote and we will be meeting again next week so hopefully we will be done by February.” The board approved 13 applications for solid waste haulers licenses and will fill the facility yard operator position at the incinerator in Fosston. 
Three social service contracts were approved where Polk County serves as the fiscal agent for the eight neighboring counties.
The commissioners also approved the purchase of two pickups for the highway department.  A Chevrolet was purchased from Thibert’s in Red Lake Falls for $22,300.00 and a Ford from Christian Brothers Ford in Crookston for $23,246.00.  
A certificate of performance and finance acceptance was approved for a highway project in Fosston and where the county was the fiscal agent and paid Gordon Construction of Mahnomen $1,169,377.65 for the work.   The county has filed to get in the lottery in the Made in Minnesota program Solar Power Tax Credit.  If the county gets selected the solar project will go on the roof of the Polk County Government Center.

 

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