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FRIDAY - JUNE 24,  2016

RIVERVIEW HEALTH TO  OFFER THEIR MONTHLY HEALTH LUNCHEON ON JUNE 30

Do you want to more closely track your health? If so, RiverView Health’s Direct Laboratory Access (DLA) program might be for you.
DLA is offered to anyone who desires to further monitor lab values between regular healthcare provider visits. If you have found that your insurance or Medicare coverage does not pay for a screening test or you want testing for a personal condition, DLA may offer that option. While DLA is not a substitute for ongoing health care with your designated provider, it does provide the opportunity to take a more active role in healthcare decisions by enabling you to select laboratory testing from a limited test menu.
For more information on DLA and what tests are available, attend RiverView’s Thursday, June 30 Health Luncheon “Direct Laboratory Access: Choosing What’s Right for You’’. RiverView’s Laboratory Director Emily Nelson will present.

Health Luncheon Details
The luncheon will be held in Meeting Room #1 beginning at noon. Meeting Room #1 is located near the RiverView Clinic entrance on the north side of the hospital and across from the elevators on first floor.
The luncheon series is in its 18th year of sponsorship by RiverView Health. All men and women interested in improving their health are invited to attend. Each luncheon starts a few minutes past noon and luncheons are kept under one hour so those needing to return to work can attend. Pre-registration is required. A boxed lunch can be purchased for $3, but must be ordered while pre-registering for the event. Call Holly Anderson at 218-281-9745 for additional information and to pre-register.

 

 

UMC GRADUATE AUSTIN STRUKEL WORKING FOR THE CITY OF CROOKSTON

Story written by Junior Emily Gruber, communications assistant in University Relations, a communication major and Golden Eagle Women’s Basketball player from Monticello.

Recent graduate Austin Strukel 2016 is getting to know Crookston more as a community rather than a college town.  He was offered an opportunity to work for the Crookston Chamber of Commerce as an intern, all while finishing his last semester of college.  When his internship ended in April, another door opened.  Strukel is now currently working for the City of Crookston. “I liked getting out into the community more,” the business management major explained.  “I was able to deal with a lot of businesses that I’ve never been to before and talk with people that I normally wouldn’t have talked to.”
At the Chamber, he worked with different businesses, promoting multiple events by writing press releases for the newspaper and radio and sending out email blasts.  For the city, Strukel is focusing more on event organization and doing some marketing for them as well.  He is currently working on the Canoe and Kayak Race for the Ox Cart Days Festival that will take place August 17-21 in Crookston. 
Strukel knew he wanted to major in business management because he enjoyed the economic courses he took at Virginia High School located in Virginia, Minnesota where he grew up.  He thought about accounting, but was looking for something a little more broad.  He also has a minor in marketing, which helped him with his internship at the Chamber, working with various advertisements.
While attending the University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC), Austin was a student-athlete, playing Golden Eagle Football. Although playing a sport in college is challenging, he felt it was rewarding as well.  “I liked being a member of a team and having a special bond with my teammates,” he mentioned.  “I think I got a lot of leadership experience and definitely a lot of experience working with groups of people.”
Strukel decided to attend UMC for the chance to play college football, but also because he appreciated the small campus.  “There’s not too many places where if you miss class, your teacher emails you or even calls you to see what is going on.” 
In his spare time, Strukel loves hunting and fishing with family and friends.  His love for this hobby has inspired him to think about owning his own business one day.  He has thought about owning an outdoors shop and has recently considered owning a hunting dog business or a marketing firm.
When asked if he was planning on staying in Crookston for a while, he responded, “I would love to go back home and be closer to the cabin.” 
But for now, Crookston is home and he is enjoying it. 

 

 

 

MAYOR WILLHITE, SHANNON STASSEN AND CLAYTON BRIGGS ATTEND LEAGUE OF MINNESOTA CITIES CONFERENCE

Crookston City Administrator Shannon Stassen recently attended the League of Minnesota Cities conference with Mayor Gary Willhite and Crookston City Council member Clayton Briggs.   Stassen said the conference covered future ideas and concerns for cities.  “It was a lot about looking to the future and how cities will survive and thrive and a lot of talk about innovation and trends,” said Stassen.  “There are so many changes that are happening rapidly so we have to be prepared to adapt the changes in technology, generations as baby boomers retire and the labor force will be short nationwide,  so it gave us a  lot of things to think about and it was very positive.”
One topic at the conference was a workforce is needed throughout the state for all areas of business.

 

 

THURSDAY - JUNE 23,  2016

POLK COUNTY TAKES ONE STEP CLOSER TO FINALIZING THE AGASSIZ RECREATIONAL TRAIL

The Polk County Commissioners met Tuesday and approved renovations at Maple Lake Park and took another step towards completing the Agassiz Recreational Trail.

The Agassiz Recreational Trail along Highway 102 in Polk County is near completion, according to Polk County Highway Engineer Rich Sanders.  Final parts of the trail were purchased for $34,000.  Part A of the Agassiz Recreational Trail is the railroad grade from Crookston to Fertile along Highway 102, then south of Fertile and Norman County has a stretch from south of Fertile to Twin Valley and Clay County has a stretch to Ulen. Part B of the trail is south of County Road 1 at Beltrami to Ada on the railroad grade that was abandoned.  “Polk County owns about a mile and a half and Norman County owns the rest and the trails are paid for with the DNR off roads grant so they are to be used as an ATV trail in the summer and snowmobiles in the winter,” said Sanders.  “The commissioners approved the final three chunks of property from Crookston to Fertile, on the sides at Melvin and Harold Station and a trail piece that was missed before to develop the trail into more of a destination for ATV’s which the DNR likes so they can stop at a station and get off and have activities like climb hills or run through mud puddles.  Now we can develop those if we wish.”

D and B Construction of Mentor will perform some renovations at the Maple Lake Park for $14,200.  
The commissioners approved two temporary part time employees for the property records department at their meeting this week. 
A COPS grant proposal if approved could bring two patrol deputies to the Polk County Sheriff’s office.  
Cathy Gutterud was reappointed to the County Social Services Board by the commissioners for another two years.  
The Polk County Historical Society gave their annual report to the county board showing they had revenue over $21,000 last year.

 

 

POLK COUNTY DISCUSSES BUILDING RENOVATIONS

The Polk County Commissioners approved renovations of the Stenberg building in Fosston to accommodate the sheriff’s department for the officers located on the east side of the county.  “We purchased the Stenberg Building three or four years ago to compliment the incinerator operation and also a need for the deputies on the east end of the county.  We needed an office on the end of the county and this will work well," said Polk County Board chairman Craig Buness.  Quam Construction of Fosston will do the renovations at $98,500.  "We need this done as the deputies are in a city building which is being renovated so they will be have a presence by the school,” said Buness.
The commissioners voted against a canopy for the entrance at Polk County Public Health at their new location at the Justice Center.  Polk County Public Health is located at the south end of the Justice Center and the county attorney and public defenders were moved to accommodate public health and the entrance on the south side was an emergency entrance. "We had to make it more presentable, but the quotes for a canopy came in up to $35,000 so that was not reasonable," said Buness.
The Board of Equalization was held by the county commissioners for residents to bring their concerns on the property assessments.  Buness said five residents came in and one of them had 10 different parcels so it was a long session and one person could be handled by a letter.  "We made some changes and some we could not change as the assessments were right on," said Buness. "Most of the residents were from the potato warehouse area and bypass area in East Grand Forks.  Sales are showing that they value was right so we could not make changes.”

 

 

CHEDA ASKING FOR THE SAME STIPEND FROM THE CITY IN 2017

The Crookston Housing and Economic Development Authority (CHEDA) discussed the budget for 2017 at their meeting this week.   CHEDA asks for a stipend from the city each year.  “Our budgeting process begins early like the city and we wanted to discuss the stipend for next year,” said CHEDA Executive Director Craig Hoiseth.  “We wanted to hold the line even if we did see a dip on the revenue side, we wanted to be frugal with our request.”
CHEDA is asking the city for $130,000 for 2017 which is the same as 2016.


 

 

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL ANNOUNCES THE A AND B HONOR ROLLS

The Crookston High School has released their A and B honor rolls.  Click here to see the list.

 

 

 

FRIENDS OF RYDELL AND GLACIAL RIDGE TO HOST A CONSERVATION FILM SERIES 

On Tuesday June 28 and Tuesday July 12, the Friends of Rydell and Glacial Ridge Refuges Association (FRGRRA) will host the showing of a special conservation-related film on the “big screen” in the Rydell National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center.  The films will begin at 6:30pm each evening and will last approximately one hour. This is a free event and light refreshments will be available.  The timing of these showings was scheduled to allow participants time to walk/bike the trails and explore Rydell Refuge after the movies and before dark.

Showing #1 on June 28, 2016   -  Duck! (a duckumentary), 2011 (60 minutes)
They swim, they waddle, and they fly. They are the subjects of art, science, history, and popular entertainment. They are cartoons, stamps, carvings, pets, livestock, urban neighbors, and even dinner. They are ducks! Across America, quirky and often comical interactions can teach us about our feathery neighbors, our planet, and ourselves.

Showing #2 on July 12, 2016  -  Everglades of the North: The Story of the Grand Kankakee Marsh, 2012 (57 minutes)
Before there was farmland, there were untamed wetlands. One of the largest in North America was the Grand Kankakee Marsh, which saturated nearly a million acres in Northern Indiana and part of Illinois.  It was home to some of the highest concentrations of wildlife on the planet. The French claimed it as part of “New France,” and it was later dubbed “Chicago’s Food Pantry” for its seemingly endless supply of fur, fowl, and fin.  For centuries, the marsh gave and man took. Today, only a fraction of this wetland survives, but all is not lost.   

The FRGRRA was formed in 1996 to assist with Refuge management, public use, and fundraising activities. This dynamic volunteer group sponsors interpretive programs, open houses, special events, and provides trail transportation for people with disabilities. They also operate a nature store in the Visitor Center to raise money for refuge activities and maintenance. In 2000, the Association was awarded the Friends Group of the Year Award by the National Wildlife Refuge Association. 

Rydell National Wildlife Refuge is located 3 miles south of Highway 2, between Mentor and Erskine, at 17788 349th St SE

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY - JUNE 22,  2016

COREY REITMEIER PLEADS GUILTY, SENTENCING TO BE HELD JULY 21

Corey Lee Reitmeier, 45 of Crookston, appeared in district court on Tuesday where he plead guilty to one count of criminal vehicular homicide.  Sentencing was set for July 21 at 9:00 a.m. which could include up to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine or both.  A plea agreement is part of the plea with the Judge making the sentence. 
The charge stems from an accident on September 26, 2015 about 8:55 p.m. on Polk County Road 57, six miles east of Highway 75 where Reitmeier was driving a motorcycle with his wife Wendy as a passenger. They hit a deer and skidded down the highway and it appeared that Wendy was thrown from the motorcycle striking the road with great force, according to the Highway Patrol report.  Reitmeier was injured and transported to RiverView Health where he consented to a blood draw which revealed a blood alcohol content at 0.186.  He was then transported to Altru Hospital in Grand Forks and was interviewed by Highway Patrol officers and Reitmeier said he had a couple of drinks in the afternoon.


 

 


CROOKSTON PARK BOARD TO HOLD MEETINGS AT SEVERAL PARKS TO GET INPUT FROM RESIDENTS

The Crookston Park Board and city council is planning on hosting community meetings throughout the city to get input from residents on park and recreation activities and other city activities.  “We will be going to the larger parks for the residents to come forth and meet the park board, city staff, and council members to bring their needs for the parks and what they see is appropriate for the area,” said Park and Crookston Park and Recreation Director Scott Riopelle.

The city accepted a painting as a gift from the Hutchins family who has ties to the city of Crookston.  “The Hutchins family is in the area for a family reunion and back in 2004 they donated some property by Titan Machinery to the city and gave us a picture at that time of a skating rink and now they gave us a painting of a buffalo in the prairie and donated it to us so we appreciate the kindness of the Hutchins and thank them for their thoughtfulness,” said Riopelle. The painting will be hung at city hall for everyone to enjoy.

 

 

CROOKSTON LOOKING AT BUILDING PICKLE BALL COURTS

Pickle ball is a growing sport in Crookston and there is need for more courts to play the game according to Crookston City Administrator Shannon Stassen who was part of the discussion at the Park Board meeting on Monday.  “Pickle Ball is very popular in Crookston and throughout the country and we are trying to make more capacity and be more user friendly and get more people playing,” said Stassen. “We share the tennis court at Shuster Park and there is some discussion about having a dedicated court just for pickle ball and pour a slab just for pickle ball so that is one of the discussion points.”

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH TO OFFER DEMENTIA COMMUNITY EDUCATION CLASS JUNE 28

If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or behavioral changes, it’s time to learn about the different forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Early detection of dementia gives you a chance to begin drug therapy, enroll in clinical studies and plan for the future.
The RiverView Care Center will offer community education titled “Effective Communication Strategies’’ Tuesday, June 28 at RiverView Health, 323 South Minnesota Street, Crookston. The session will be held from 6 to 7:30 PM in Meeting Room 4.
This session is designed to provide practical information and resources to help dementia caregivers learn to decode verbal and behavioral messages from people with dementia. The goals of the program are for participants to better understand the changes in communication that occur with the disease progression and how they manifest in the person with dementia, and to be able to identify ways to connect at each stage of the disease.
Objectives include:
- understanding the communication changes that take place throughout the course of the disease
- how to decode the verbal and behavioral messages delivered by someone with dementia and respond in ways that are helpful to the person
- how to identify strategies to help you connect and communicate at each stage of the disease

Jess Steinbrenner will present both workshops. Steinbrenner is the Western Minnesota program manager with the Alzheimer’s Association Minnesota-North Dakota chapter. Steinbrenner provides direct services to individuals and families who are navigating their way through Alzheimer’s disease as well as providing community and professional education throughout the region. There will be time set aside for questions and answers.
Certificates of Attendance will be given at each workshop. The event is open to the public and free of charge. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call RiverView Care Center Activities Director and Social Services Designee Kalie Crayton at
218-281-9458.

 

 

VICKIE AND RAND HUGHES TO BE HONORED AS EXPERIENCED CITIZENS OF THE MONTH

Vickie and Rand Hughes are being honored on Friday as the experienced Americans for the month at the Golden Link.   Rand Hughes is a California native who went to 11 different schools from kindergarten to 12th grade and ended up in Minnesota in 1972.   “I’m a California boy and when I was a junior my parents divorced and after I graduated I came back to see my mother who was living in Mentor and never left,” said Hughes. “I started at the sheriff’s office in 1974 became and EMT with the ambulance in 1975 and stayed with the Sheriff for about 17 years and EMT until 1995.”  Rand has volunteered at the Golden Link and was president for a couple of years and worked in the Polk County Assessor’s office from 1988 until 2008. He worked for four different sheriffs starting with Paul Coauette, Earl Mosher, Doug Qualley and Mark LeTexier. 
Vickie Hughes is a Crookston native who worked for Polk County since college graduation.  “I started right out of college in Moorhead and worked for three different auditors starting with Martin Vanseth, Larry Fontaine and then Jerry Amiot,” said Vickie.  “After retirement I worked for three years at the Cathedral, where I do a lot of volunteer work now in the church and school library. I also volunteer in the RSVP shopping program.”
The Hughes raised three sons, Nicholas who lives in North Carolina and is engaged, Matt is in Crookston and Andy is married and lives in Wisconsin. 
The Experienced American reception is on Friday from 1:30 to 3:30 at the Golden Link and everyone is welcome.

 

 

THIS WEEK IS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK

It’s too easy to think we’re invincible when it comes to lightning storms—going outside, staying in the pool, or continuing a softball game as thunder sounds in the distance are not safe activities when lightning and thunder are in the area. Instead, move indoors when thunder roars—such a simple step could save more than 400 people from getting struck by lightning every year.  Consider also downloading the free FEMA app, available for your Android, Apple or Blackberry device, so you have the information at your fingertips to prepare for severe weather.

In recognition of Lightning Safety Awareness Week, this week through June 25, 2016, FEMA is encouraging everyone to get storm safety smart:

 

 

 

TUESDAY - JUNE 21,  2016

CHEDA APPROVES A LOAN FOR A NEW MOBILE BRAKE AND SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SHOP

The Crookston Housing and Economic Development Authority met Tuesday morning and approved a loan for Paul Kezar and his business A+ Mobile Brake and Small Engine Service located on East Robert Street.  Kezar came before the board asking for $7,000 to get his business started and the board approved the request.  “Kezar will provide a needed service to the Crookston area,” said CHEDA’s Craig Hoiseth.   The $7,000 will be used for startup costs, inventory and equipment. 
Kezar will repair brakes on customer’s vehicles on location.  He will have the necessary parts, tools, and equipment where the vehicle is parked adding an element of convenience to the customer. 
Kezar is a native of Thief River Falls and has moved to Crookston. He operated a small repair business when he was a full time police officer in Thief River Falls. He is evaluating bringing on a line of lawn mowers in the near future.

 

 

CROOKSTON PARK BOARD DISCUSSES A SAFER CROSSING TO THE CSC, FIVE YEAR COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

The Crookston Park Board met on Monday and part of the discussion was park bathrooms that get vandalized when they are open, but they will have Wildwood Park and Highland Park bathrooms daily to accommodate residents and guests.  “We are opening the bathrooms in Wildwood and Highland and we are getting vandalism in them, especially at the Highland complex,” said Crookston Park and Recreation director Scott Riopelle.  “We are asking people to help keep them clean and if anyone sees someone acting out of place to call so we can get help.” 

The Park Board is working on a five year plan upgrade parks, trucks and mowers so we have to lay it out over a five year period.

Part of a plan that was discussed was Castle Park getting a nine hole disc golf course. “One of our goals have been to reduce the mowing in Castle Park which has a lot of open space and we are looking at expanding to have a nine hole disc golf course to go with the one that is in Central Park so this would give us 18 holes and give us a bigger draw for everyone and maybe get people from out of town,” said Crookston City Administrator Shannon Stassen.

Other items in the five year plan include fencing at Highland Park, including around the holding pound by the splash park, picnic tables, benches, playground equipment and a mower for 2016.

The board members have a concern for safety on Fisher Avenue near the Crookston Sports Center where there is a lot of traffic especially with children heading for the sports center during busy travel times on the road.  They will start asking about a traffic study to see if there could be some solutions to slow traffic and make the crossing safer for the children. 

The park board will research and study to learn more about Blue Zones communities which are the healthiest, happiest and longest living communities on earth which can be done by moving naturally, eating wisely, having the right outlook and connect.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON CIVIC ARENA LLC DISSOLVED, CITY OF CROOKSTON "OFFICIALLY" TAKES OVER

The Crookston Civic Arena LLC was dissolved at a meeting of the board this morning. It was created in March 2009 so the city could build a new three sheet ice area located outside of the flood plain.   The state of Minnesota paid $10 million as a grant for the ice arena relocation along with market tax credits which required the creation of an LLC for financing.  “The financial unwinding was completed in April, 2016 and there is no need for the LLC to be their own entity anymore so the arena will be part of the city assets,” said Crookston Finance Director Angel Weasner. “The park and recreation director is running the facility with the financial information flowing through the Park and Recreation department.”
All funds and assets were transferred to the city of Crookston.

 

 

63 MEN TAKE PART IN RIVERVIEW HEALTH'S FREE PROSTATE SCREENING PROGRAM

A “great gift for Father’s Day” is how one participant referred to RiverView Health’s free prostate screening held Tuesday night in Crookston. Sixty-three men participated in the fifth Annual Father’s Day Prostate Awareness and Free Screening Program June 14.
With the 63 men screened, 6 men received results leading them to further testing and allowing them the chance to get treatment at an earlier time, if necessary, than if they hadn’t gone through the screening. Those numbers fall within the statistic from the American Cancer Society that states one in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime.
“It’s sobering that these men received feedback and undesired test results,’’ said Foundation Director Kent Bruun. “But I am confident that these patients are extremely grateful that we offered these screenings on their behalf. With our positive influence, they became aware of their health conditions and are able to deal with them in a timely proactive manner.’’
The free screening was made possible through the RiverView Foundation, staff at the North Clinic and Lab, RiverView Urologist Dr. Steven Schultz, Cancer Center of North Dakota Oncologist Dr. Bill Noyes and Foundation Board President Kurt Heldstab. Heldstab is a 20-year cancer survivor who in appreciation of his own health experiences dedicates his Foundation donations to helping fund the lab costs associated with the screening.  After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men.  “The Foundation Board of Directors, RiverView staff, and donors are committed to supporting this cause and we are already looking ahead to the sixth annual event during Father’s Day week 2017,’’ Bruun stated. “This Foundation and donor sponsored screening event is another example of our commitment to give back to our community and to serve the healthcare needs of our patients.’’
To donate to this program, contact Bruun at 218-281-9249 or kbruun@riverviewhealth.org.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1947 HOLDS THEIR 69TH REUNION

Some members of the Crookston Central Class of 1947 gathered at Crookston Inn on June 20 to celebrate their 69th reunion.


Back row - Pearl DeBoer Radi, Eunice Urness Sondrol, Rena Jenni Willert, Dorothy Hegg Carlson. Front row - Joyce Dillon Reitmeier, Isabel Gramer Tronson, Mary Lou Steenerson Trudeau (Picture submitted by Connie Haller)

 


 

PRIMARY ELECTION ABSENTEE VOTING STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 24

Secretary of State Steve Simon reminds Minnesotans that beginning this Friday, June 24, eligible voters can begin casting their ballots early for the August 9 Primary Election by voting absentee. 
Minnesotans can request an absentee ballot to be mailed to them, or they can vote absentee in-person at their county or local elections office. 
The summer is a busy time for many Minnesotans, which is why it’s so important to request an absentee ballot for the August 9 Primary today and ensure your voice is heard, said Secretary Simon. �Eligible Minnesotans who can’t make it to the polls on Election Day no longer need an excuse to vote absentee and can cast their absentee ballots by mail or in-person no questions asked.
This is the first presidential-election year where Minnesotans no longer need an excuse to vote absentee a reform also known as no-excuses absentee voting. No-excuses absentee voting first went into effect in 2014 and led to a 55 percent increase in accepted absentee ballots compared to the last non-presidential election year in 2010. As a legislator, Secretary Simon was the chief author of the no-excuses bill.    

HOW TO REQUEST AN ABSENTEE BALLOT
Minnesota voters can request an absentee ballot quickly and easily at mnvotes.org using the online application
Voters can also request an absentee ballot by downloading the 2016 Minnesota Absentee Ballot Application and returning it to their county election office by email, mail, or fax.  Absentee Ballot Application forms are available in English, Spanish, Hmong, Somali, Vietnamese, Russian, Chinese, Lao, Oromo, Khmer, and Amharic
Voters can request an absentee ballot even if they are not registered to vote a voter registration application will be provided with their ballot. 

IMPORTANT DEADLINES
Voting Absentee by Mail: Minnesotans voting absentee by mail must make sure their ballot is returned on or before the August 9 Primary Election. Ballots returned after August 9 will not be counted. 

Voting Absentee In-Person: The last day to vote absentee in-person is Monday, August 8. 

MILITARY AND OVERSEAS VOTERS
Minnesotans serving in the military or living abroad temporarily or indefinitely can have an absentee ballot sent to them anywhere in the world. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1Yybb1v

TRACKING YOUR BALLOT
Beginning June 24, upon requesting an absentee ballot, voters may check the status of their ballot, such as when it was mailed, and if their completed ballot was received and accepted by their local elections office.
Voters can use My Ballot to view their sample ballot and find links to candidates websites. 

NOTE: Every precinct in the state will have a primary election with at least the Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Seat 6 race on the ballot. All congressional districts, except congressional districts 3 and 8, will also have a primary race on the ballot. 

 

 

 

MONDAY - JUNE 20,  2016

POLK COUNTY PHONE SYSTEM DOESN'T ALLOW CENTURY LINK CALLS GET THROUGH TO 911

On June 19 at approximately 11:00 p.m., the Polk County Sheriff's Office was made aware that the 911 calls for our area were not getting through to our office and callers were receiving a recorded error message.  At the time, they attempted to have the calls rerouted to another agency.  The re-rout attempt failed.  The problem is being worked on aggressively by Century Link and every effort is being made to resolve this issue.  Until then, if you have an emergency they are asking the public to call our administrative phone number at 281-0431.
The Polk County Sheriff's office will alert the media when the problem is resolved.

**Update**
All 911 lines have been restored and are back to normal.

 

 

CITY OF FISHER TO HOLD A MEETING TONIGHT  TO DEVELOP A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE CITY

The city of Fisher will hold a special meeting tonight at 7:00 at the Fisher American Legion to develop a comprehensive plan for the city.  They have contracted with the Northwest Regional Development Commission to assist them in developing the plan. Community input is critical to the future of the Fisher community and they are invited to the meeting to provide direction for this comprehensive plan.   Everyone in the community is welcome to attend the meeting.

 

 

POLK COUNTY FAIR CHOCOLATE CONTEST TAKING ENTRIES

Chocolate, schokolade, sjokolade, la cioccolata, el chocolate… in any language it evokes thoughts of sweet, dreamy decadence. We invite you to prepare your most incredible chocolate masterpiece and enter the Polk County Fair Chocolate Contest. This event is sponsored by Al & Laura’s Foods and Kappes-Leiran Agency, Inc.
Entries must be submitted by 6:30 pm, Wednesday, July 6, in the Open Class Foods building. Judging begins at 7:00 pm on the Hanson Free Stage. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three winners in both adult and youth categories. Adult prizes: 1st place - $75.00, 2nd place - $50.00, 3rd place - $40.00. Youth prizes: 1st place - $25.00, 2nd place - $20.00, 3rd place - $15.00.
For more details and entry criteria, visit the Polk County Fair website at www.polkcountyfairfertilemn.com/chocolatecontest or call Nancy Grunhovd at (218) 945-6266 or Diane Littlefield at (218) 280-2290.

 

 

FARMERS NEED TO CERTIFY THEIR ACRES AND SIGN UP FOR THE FARM PROGRAM SOON

It’s time for farmers to get their acres certified and sign up for the farm program. “We want to remind producers that it is the time to come in and certify their acres,” said Bruce Nelson, Executive Director at the Farm Service Agency.  “Our office did not have the time or manpower to print the maps so we e-mailed them the maps so they can print them out and use them for their certification.”  The deadline to certify acres is July 15 and Nelson said they are about one third done and still way behind on the farm program sign up so if farmers have a moment to come in as soon as they can. August 1 is the deadline for farm program sign up.

It is also time for farmers to vote for their county committee members. “We opened up the nomination period on June 15 for the committee member in the northern third area,” said Nelson. “Steve Moen represents the area now and is eligible for another term, if anyone is interested in getting involved in the county board it is important as they handle issues and suggestions for the programs.”
Stop at the Farm Service Agency office in Crookston for more information.

 

 

POLK COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE INVESTIGATES PULKRABEK FARMS BOOKKEEPER

On January, 19, 2016 the Polk County Sheriff’s Office received a complaint from Pulkrabek Farms in rural Polk County.  The complaint reported was that a book keeper for the farm had been writing unauthorized business checks and the book keeper had also has given themselves an unauthorized raise.  Through further investigation it was discovered there were multiple unauthorized checks written and credit card charges which totaled over $100,000. 
On June 9, the Polk County Sheriff’s Office arrested Rebecca Rae Thompson, age 41 of East Grand Forks, for this offense.  Rebecca made her first court appearance on 6-10-16 where she was charged with Felony Check Forgery, Felony Financial Transaction Card Fraud and Felony Theft by false Representation.
No further information is being released at this time.

 

 

NORTHWEST MINNESOTA MOTORISTS CAN EXPECT BRIEF DELAYS AS CREWS REPAIR STORM SEWER CATCH BASINS

Motorists can expect brief delays and lane closures on highways around northwestern Minnesota beginning Monday, June 20, as crews repair storm sewer catch basins that will extend the life of the highway surface. The preventative maintenance will take place in multiple locations along the following highways: 

· Akeley – Highway 34, Hulet Avenue SW to Pleasant Avenue SE
· Argyle –
Highway 75, Second Street to Fifth Street
· Blackduck –
Highway 71, intersection with Main Street N
· Bemidji –
Highway 197, 13th Street NW to Norton Avenue NW
· Clearbrook –
Highway 92, Fourth Avenue SW to First Avenue SW
· East Grand Forks –
Highway 2B, Third Ave NE to River Street
· Grygla –
Highway 89, Marshall Avenue to Sixth Avenue
· Lake George –
Highway 71, intersection with Hubbard County Road 4
· Northome
Highway 1, Main Street to Minnesota Street
· Park Rapids –
Highway 71, Eighth Street W to Main Avenue N
· Red Lake Falls –
Highway 32, Dow Avenue SE to Bottineau Avenue NE
· Walker –
Highway 371, Tianna Drive to Michigan Ave and Elm Avenue south 1200 feet
· Warroad –
Highway 11, intersection with Highway 313 to Roseau County Road 5

Motorists should plan for shoulder and/or lane closures in the area where crews are working. Crews will work during daylight hours and once complete at one location, they will move on to the next section. Hydro-Klean is the contractor for the $516,000 project. It is expected to last through September, weather permitting.
MnDOT urges motorists to always drive with caution, and reminds them to slow down in the work zone and never enter a roadway that has been blocked with barriers or cones.
For real-time traffic and travel information anywhere in Minnesota, visit www.511mn.org, call 5-1-1 or log on towww.mndot.gov.

 

 

DISTRICT 1 REUBLICANS HOLD A MEET AND GREET WITH THE CANDIDATES

Area Republicans held a picnic Saturday evening at the Spring Lake Park in Lengby.  It was an opportunity to meet the candidates for office on the Republican ticket from our district.  Dave Hughes, running for U. S. Representative; George Bosselman of Fosston, Senate District 1 Chairman; Deb Kiel, running for District 1B State Representative; and Mark Johnson, candidate for State Senate, all spoke to the gathering.


George Bosselman and Dave Hughes at the picnic (Picture by Lucile Torkelson)

 

DEER MAKE A VISIT TO A NEIGHBORHOOD ON THE NORTH END OF CROOKSTON


Two deer were walking through the yards of residents on the 400 block of Johnson Place on the north end of Crookston.  It was a pleasant surprise to some of the residents in the neighborhood.  (Picture by Rand Hughes)

 

 

POLK COUNTY COMMISSIONER WARREN STRANDELL INKS ANOTHER COUNTY LINE COLUMN

The County Line
By Warren Strandell
Polk County Commissioner, Dist. 2

It is difficult to follow the review procedure that is involved with getting the proposed Sandpiper pipeline project through permit process— and that of the Line 3 replacement project, too.
But if there is one thing that remains obvious in the procedure, it is that every effort is made for those opposed to the project to have their say. The opponents, even though they are a small minority, seem to be working under the theory that if they can’t stop the Sandpiper from being constructed, they must delay it for as long as possible. For the most part, that strategy seems to be working.
The permit process starts with the development of a “draft” Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). In that procedure, the Minnesota Department of Commerce recently held 12 “scoping” meetings to collect information about possible impact.
One of the more crazy claims to come out of one of those 12 meetings was that Saudi Arabian oil is better than American oil. Was that to be interpreted to mean that the U.S. should be importing Saudi Arabian oil rather than tapping its resources? Would that make $4 gas better than today’s price while also making the United States again more dependent upon the whims of countries that just plain don’t like us and even go so far as to fund terrorism activities.
The last of those 12 scoping sessions was held on May 4 and the comment period for the draft EIS has now ended. The “scope” of that document is to determine what should or should not be included in the regulations.
But hold on, that is just the first part of the three-step process. Once a draft EIS is developed there will be another series of public meetings to take testimony concerning a route for the pipeline… one meeting is to be held in each county through which the Sandpiper would pass.
That means that there will be at least 15 meetings concerning for the route proposed by Enbridge. Plus, there will be at least a minimum of another six meeting for routes that have been proposed by other interests. And the total of meetings could go up from there if the routes that have been proposed through the southern part of Minnesota are considered.
At the conclusion of the routing determination, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission is to start its regulatory process. This will mean another round of public meetings.
Although it failed to get traction at a recent proceeding, a “citizen request” was made to the Minnesota Environmental Quality Board (EQB) to change from the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to some combination of the Pollution Control Agency and the Department of Natural Resources as the state government unit that would be responsible for regulatory authority.
Minnesota statutes clearly state that the responsible government unit for pipeline regulation is the PUC and the EQB, despite opposition by some of the citizen members on its board, voted to keep it that way. Both the Pollution Control Agency (PCA) and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) have stated on the record that the PUC and the Department of Commerce have the most knowledge for pipeline environmental review and siting. Had the request for a change in the agency responsible for regulation been approved, who knows where the process would be going.
A positive in this action is that the PUC has signed a memo of understanding with the DNR and the MPCA that they are work together on the EIS. This development should help to brunt the grumblings of the opposition who most likely will claim that the EIS will not be adequate.
What seems to be lost in all of this is that one way or the other the petroleum will get from the Bakken to Superior, Wis., and that pipelines are the safest and most environmentally friendly way to accomplish that delivery.
In addition to environmental safety and efficiency in moving the oil, the Sandpiper is important to Polk County because of the jobs that will be created during construction and because of the tax benefit that will occur when the line is completed. The tax bill to Enbridge for the Sandpiper has been projected to be about $2 million a year. That’s an amount that will have a good effect on our tax bills.
Despite all of the ongoing attempts to delay, if not roadblock the project, Enbridge still expects to have the Sandpiper in operation by 2019. Let’s hope that’s not a dream.

Thoughts for the day:

No man's life, liberty, or property is safe while the legislature is in session.­­ — Mark Twain (1866)
One must wait until evening to see how splendid the day has been. — Will Rogers

Disclaimer: Thoughts expressed in this column are those of the author and are not necessarily a reflection of the opinions of the other members of the Polk County Board of Commissioners

 

 

 

SATURDAY - JUNE 18,  2016

CROOKSTON POLICE CALLED TO WALMART FOR A BOMB THREAT

At approximately 8:15 Friday evening the Crookston Police Department responded to a bomb threat at Walmart in Crookston. The authorities evacuated the customers and employees and the building was searched, and reopened a few hours later. Assisting in the incident were the employees of Walmart, Polk County Dispatchers, Polk County Sheriff’s Deputies, Minnesota St. Patrol, University of Minnesota Crookston Security Services and the Crookston Fire Department. No other details are available at this time as the case remains active.

 

 

 


 

FRIDAY - JUNE 17,  2016

CROOKSTON SPLASH PARK GRAND OPENING A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS

The Crookston Splash Park grand opening attendance was a tremendous success with hundreds of children and their families attending the ceremony on Thursday evening at the Highland Park Complex.  The 350 nachos from Taco Johns and the 450 hotdogs were all gone and the kids enjoyed playing in the brand new splash park. 

Hannah Hanshaw was enjoying the park. “It is pretty cool and awesome to have something like this in Crookston for the kids to have fun,” said Hanshaw. “It works well with the playground and skate park, so they are having tons of fun.”

Nicole Volker loved the park. “I think it will be an amazing addition for the kids in Crookston and give them a lot of activities and enjoyment for years to come,” said Volker. “Everyone did a great job in making it and putting in it a good spot,” said Volker.

Don Cavalier, Crookston Park Board chairman and Rotarian said the event demonstrated what partnerships can do for the community with the city, Lions, Rotary and community donations. “It is really looking good with the work done by the committee,” said Cavalier. “Scott Riopelle did a good job getting the final touches like grass in place for tonight. The skate park, playground and the splash park put it all together for the kids.  The Lions shelter gives some shade, the Rotary donated money for the benches which are nice, so we are happy about how it all turned out.”

Mayor Gary Willhite presented the Splash Park fundraiser coordinators Ann Longtin and Shirley Iverson certificates of appreciation.


Click above to see the video of the kids enjoying the new splash park at the Highland Complex


Hundreds of children enjoyed the grand opening of the Crookston Splash Park Thursday evening


Crookston Mayor Gary Willhite gives a certificate of appreciation to Splash Park fundraisers, Ann Longtin and Shirley Iverson


The Crookston Splash park is a great addition to the Highland Complex park.  Kids enjoyed the grand opening

 

 

 

HUGO'S FAMILY MARKETPLACE'S KRISTI MAGNUSON NELSON NAMED ONE OF PROGRESSIVE GROCER MAGAZINE'S TOP WOMEN

Hugo’s Family Marketplace is pleased to announce that Kristi Magnuson Nelson, President of Hugo’s, has been selected as one of Progressive Grocer Magazine’s Top Women in Grocery for 2016. Progressive Grocer Magazine recognizes women in the grocery industry each year, this being their 10th year of selecting recipients of the Top Women in Grocery award. They define the top women in grocery as dedicated professionals who routinely transcend the limits of what’s expected, both at work and in the wider world of their industry peers and community. Top Women are also creative, resourceful, assertive and inspirational in their leadership, generous with their time and expertise, and unequivocally passionate about what they do. Progressive Grocer Magazine cites Kristi’s leadership through the remodel of 5 of their 10 stores in the last year. Specifically noting the expansion of the Natural Foods sections and expanded deli departments. They also recognized Hugo’s successful partnership with Altru Health System in launching the Healthy Living program. “I am humbled and honored to receive this recognition”, said MagnusonNelson. “I am fortunate to be surrounded by amazingly talented, caring and ambitious women and men working in our stores every day, who all contribute to our success.” In 2014, Magnuson Nelson was awarded the National Grocer’s Association Spirit of America Award, and in 2015, she received the North Dakota Grocer of the Year Award. Magnuson Nelson was selected as one of Prairie Business Magazine’s Top Women in Business recently. She is active with the Grand Forks/East Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce, currently serving as past chair of the Board of Directors. Kristi also serves on the board of directors for the local Prairie Harvest Foundation, the North Dakota Grocers Association, Minnesota Grocers Association and the National Grocers Association. She also supports the local United Way, UND, North Dakota Museum of Art and several other organizations in the communities they serve. Magnuson Nelson and her husband, Bob, live in Grand Forks

 

 

 

AREA WOMEN RECEIVE AWARDS AND ELECTED TO OFFICE AT NINTH DISTRICT AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY CONVENTION

The Ninth District American Legion Auxiliary held their 2016 Convention in Mahnomen, Minnesota on June10-11 2016.
Auxiliary members from Crookston, representing the American Legion Auxiliary Unit #20 were Margee Keller and Sharon Lanctot. Linda Gibson of Moorhead, Minnesota, District President of the American Legion Auxiliary presided.  The Department of Minnesota Commander James Kellogg brought his greetings.
Special highlights of this convention were the performance of the Ninth District Band.  The presentation of President Gibson’s project proceeds to Lance Akers of the Honor Flight program.  President Gibson was able to raise $10,246, enough for 13 veterans to go on the next Honor Flight.  Awards received by Crookston Unit#20 were the Rapacz Traveling Trophy for our Membership program, Margee Keller Chairman, the Christensen Hoie Award for our Poppy Program, Jamie Cassavant, Chairman and a Certificate of Participation for our Public Relations Program.
The newly elected officers for 2016 American Legion Auxiliary, District 9 are:  Joanie Krantz, District President from Karlstad; Doreen Norgaard, District 9 First Vice President, from Bagley; Lynn Carr, District 9 Second Vice President, from Thief River Falls; Kathy Englund, 1st Executive Committee Member, from Karlstad and Patricia Hanson, 2nd Executive Committee Member from Middle River.


Sharon Lanctot, American Legion Auxiliary President Unit 20, Crookston, Linda Gibson, District 9 President and Margee Keller, Membership Chair, Unit 20, Crookston.

 

 

WEST ROBERT STREET CONSTRUCTION WILL CONTINUE ON MONDAY

Knife River Materials, the bituminous paving contractor for the Crookston street improvement projects will be working on West Robert Street on Monday, June 13, weather permitting. The work on West Robert Street will involve milling the bituminous surface from Main Street to the Sampson’s Addition Bridge.  Please avoid the area if possible and use an alternative route to and from the Sampson’s Addition while the work is ongoing. Once the milling work is completed the roadway will be reopened to traffic.

 

 

 

THURSDAY - JUNE 16,  2016

RIVERVIEW HEALTH IS OFFERING UP TO $20,000 REWARD TO THE PUBLIC TO HELP BRING IN PHYSICIANS

RiverView Health is looking for a few good men and women, and is asking for the community’s help in bringing qualified physicians to its organization.
The RiverView Health Community Physician Recruiter Incentive Program was recently launched to engage the community in the effort to connect with and successfully recruit physicians to RiverView’s great community and hospital for a rewarding career in medicine. In return, anyone responsible for igniting the spark that eventually brings a qualified physician to full-time employment at RiverView will be justly rewarded financially.
The program is an effort to get out ahead of the forecasted physician shortage.
Studies show that there will be a shortage of about 90,000 physicians in the year 2020 and an even greater gap of about 130,000 in 2025. With the community’s help, RiverView is looking to keep that shortage at bay.  “We are so blessed with the support of the communities we serve, each and every day,’’ said RiverView Health President and CEO Carrie Michalski. “RiverView has hundreds of friends that are part of our nonprofit association, regular volunteers, Foundation donors and members of our Hospital Auxiliary.  So when faced with a challenge to ensure an ample supply of talented and highly trained physicians to anchor our community hospital, at a time when the nation has a shortage of doctors, who better to turn to than our friends and neighbors?  We all care deeply about our quality of life and it is likely most of us know talented young men and women who aspire to become doctors, or experienced physicians with a connection to Northwestern Minnesota who desire to make this home.  This program is to encourage a coordinated community effort that will spark conversations, and assist RiverView Health in identifying physician partners who can be recruited to join us in carrying on over a century of service to our friends and neighbors.’’

How it Works
Community recruiters assist the hospital by sharing physician opportunities with family, friends, classmates, colleagues and others. When a physician or physician-in-training expresses a desire to learn more, community recruiters complete a form (by paper or online at www.riverviewhealth.org) to alert RiverView of the potential candidate. Follow-up communication will be conducted based on candidate preference.
Upon physician commencement of full-time employment with a minimum commitment of three years of service, the recruiter will be paid $10,000, as well as per year payments of $2,000 for the first five years the physician serves at RiverView Health.
The list of current physician opportunities at RiverView is always posted on the RiverView Health website at www.riverviewhealth.org

Currently RiverView’s recruitment priorities are:
·       Family Practice, with OB
·       General Surgery
·       Internal Medicine

“Inviting the community to join our recruiting efforts extends the network of individuals vested in the future of our health system exponentially,’’ Michalski stated.

Why it Matters
RiverView Health is a community owned hospital and a key component to the success of the community. RiverView provides care for people near and far, bringing big business to the community as a vital component of the local economy. Having a local, high caliber healthcare facility in the community is also a major factor when people choose where they live.
RiverView Health has nearly 400 employees and an annual payroll of $27 million. The loss of the hospital would create a devastating impact on the community in both the local economy and the quality of life.
RiverView Health is a growing and vibrant institution in the community. But it takes dedicated physicians and staff to provide healthcare experiences that consistently exceed patients’ expectations through exceptional people and exceptional care for exceptional outcomes.

A Great Place to Live
While bringing native physicians back to the area is a welcome idea, RiverView Health also wants to encourage those from other areas to join its community and RiverView family.
Dr. Mirza Baig is a gastroenterologist at RiverView who, along with his wife Fugi, moved to Crookston in 1999. A native of Pakistan, Dr. Baig said they were immediately impressed with how friendly everyone was at all times.  “People are so nice. That’s the thing that’s kept us here,’’ he shared. “The people are genuinely, genuinely nice. We found the things that we were looking for in a community: safety, quality of life, things to do, a financial fit. The town is beautiful. Yes, it’s flat but I appreciate the vast open fields and sky, and the beautiful sunsets.’’
On his long list of pros of living in the Crookston community, Dr. Baig also includes affordable housing, proximity to lakes, and the ability to drive to work in 5 to 10 minutes.  “I can leave work and go to my kids’ events and get back to work in a short time.’’
The Baig’s two children, son Tai, 14, and daughter Zara, 11, were both born at RiverView Health. Both participate in a variety of sports and excel academically. Tai has a third degree poom belt in Tae Kwon Do (a black belt in his age division), and Zara recently took 15th place out of 170 students in a section of the regional Math Masters of Minnesota Challenge and was the winner of the Crookston School District’s spelling bee for fifth through eighth grades.  “The schools here are very good,’’ Dr. Baig stated. “Small classes allow for so much attention, it’s like a private school. The teachers are excellent. A small school allows kids to try out everything.’’
Fugi, a native of Chicago, is a strong believer in giving back to the community. She is a member of the Agassiz Study Club, coordinates children’s theatre and volunteers in the Crookston School District; now serving as the president of the Parent Teacher Organization. Dr. Baig recently volunteered his time at the school as well, answering Zara’s call to help draw chalk art on the sidewalk outside Highland School for Teacher Appreciation Week.
And while the Baigs may be outnumbered by Scandinavians in the community, they both report that it has become much easier to find ethnic food on store shelves in Crookston, and with Grand Forks being so close and Fargo only an hour away, there are a variety of ethnic restaurants and cultures to be shared.
One of Dr. Baig’s favorite community events is the International Dinner Series held at the University of Minnesota-Crookston. He credits the University with bringing great culture to the area.

A Great Place to Practice
Dr. Baig has worked in a variety of settings, including Boston, Chicago and southern Minnesota. In all of his experience, it’s the staff at RiverView Health that impresses him the most.  “Ninety-nine percent of the staff has unbeatable work ethic. They will show up in a storm. They know what they are doing. They make my work pleasant.’’
The Baigs have also made RiverView a more pleasant place to work, creating a scholarship to benefit RiverView employees looking to further their medical education in memory of Dr. Baig’s father Mirza Abdur Rahim Baig.
Dr. Baig sees patients at RiverView’s Specialty Clinic, Crookston, at RiverView’s recently opened Thief River Falls Clinic, and at First Care Health Center, Park River, ND.
For more information on this program or to offer information on a possible recruit, call Stacey Bruggeman at 218-281-9440.

 

 

CROOKSTON CHAMBER BEAUTIFICATION AWARDS COMMITTEE ANNOUNCES FIRST LIST OF FINALISTS

The first round of judging for the Chamber Beautification Awards has been completed, the businesses are up the award in each category.

Presentation of a Landscaped Business
Drafts Bar and Grill
Agcountry Farm Credit Union
Crookston National Bank
McDonald’s
Arby’s
American Federal Bank
Bremer Bank
Fischer Law Office
Stenshoel-Houske Funeral Home
Happy Joe’s

Presentation of a Store Front Business
Rejuv’ Salon & Spa
This is Sew Broadway
Cofe’
RBJ’S
Andy Oman State Farm
Longtin Agency, Inc.
Renu Dental
Pulkrabek State Farm Insurance
UMC Bookstore
Willow & Ivy

Presentation of a Public Institution or Church
Crookston Fire Department
Evangelical Covenant
St. Paul’s Lutheran
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
Polk County DAC
Villa St. Vincent
Trinity Lutheran
Our Savior’s Lutheran
Roman Catholic Diocese of Crookston
Crookston Library

Brand New Category: Presentation of a Building Restoration
Hugo’s
Wonderful Life Foods
Christian Brothers Ford
Sanbridge Properties
Opticare
 

 

 

KIDS AGES BIRTH TO 18 CAN GET FREE LUNCH AT THE HIGHLAND PARK COMPLEX

The free summer lunch program for Crookston children ages birth to 18 years started on Monday and Crookston School District Food Service Director Anna Brekken said they had approximately 70 children and hope they get more each day.  They serve lunch at Highland Park Complex at the Lion’s shelter from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  A chicken patty on a bun served with fruit, vegetable and milk was served on Wednesday and meals are given away on a first come first served basis.  Meals are free to all children.

 

 

POLK COUNTY TOWARD ZERO DEATHS COALITION HONORS PREMIER SIGNS AND SKY DIGITAL SIGNS

The Polk County Toward Zero Deaths Coalition has recognized the efforts of Premier Signs, a locally owned billboard advertising company in Mentor and Sky Digitals Sign in Fargo, as they recognized the action to reduce fatal and serious injuries on Minnesota roads.  The two companies generously donate in kind billboard signage promoting traffic safety.  
Their advertising supports the efforts of the Polk County Toward Zero Deaths Coalition by working to create a culture for which traffic fatalities and serious injuries are no longer acceptable. 
For more information contact Leah Reitmeier at leah.reitmeier@co.polk.mn.us or call Polk County Public Health at 281-3385.


Lieutenant Brad Norland, Minnesota State Patrol/TZD Coalition Member; Nick Aakhus of Premier Signs, and Leah Reitmeier, Toward Zero Deaths Coordinator-Polk County Public Health


 

ERSKINE WOMAN BREAKS HAND TRYING TO ROW FROM CALIFORNIA TO HAWAII IN FUNDRAISER

Erin Hammer of Erskine, and Ryan Foss of Brainerd, are competing in the Endurance Limits USA rowing team competing in the Great Pacific Race.  They are trying to row from California to Hawaii and unfortunately the trip has been cut short after the team took on a big wave and briefly capsized before righting itself. During the tussle, team member Erin Hammer sustained a broken wrist. After tending to the injury on the boat per their training, they made the decision to seek more advanced medical attention. Both Erin Hammer and Ryan Foss were evacuated from the boat via helicopter Monday morning. As a result of this unforeseen accident that no one could have prepared for, Endurance Limits USA has made the difficult decision to suspend their efforts to complete the Great Pacific Race. The team will provide a more detailed race recap in the near future, but for now they send thanks to family, friends, sponsors and supporters for the generosity and support. Erin and Ryan are grateful that, despite this turn of events, they have been able to raise more than $150,000 for children’s hospitals across the country. 

 FOR THE OBITUARY PAGE  CLICK HERE

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